energy gradient

energy gradient

[′en·ər·jē ‚grād·ē·ənt]
(physics)
Any change in energy over time or space.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But in reality the unaccounted increase (or decrease) in kinetic energy reveals that during the flyby the spacecraft does descend down (or move up) along a potential energy gradient, so that the initial and final states are not equal in energetic terms.
We aim at simulating the trajectory of droplets transported by a pressure-driven carrier fluid, as they evolve in a surface energy gradient, generated by channel depth variations or surface tension inhomogeneities.
The purpose of this paper is to locate energy gradient dissipation as a fundamental conceptual node for a natural philosophy.
Several million years ago, a random aggregation of minerals somehow coalesced into a single entity, which was able to maintain an energy gradient across a membrane that gave birth to life on Earth.
By providing an energy gradient around which self-organization can occur, it is possible to have ecosystems produce bioenergy.
The expanded reproduction of free energy in probionts maintains their positive free energy gradient with respect to the environment.
In physical systems, the presence of a steep energy gradient is an invitation for an accident waiting to happen.
They contain a large number of chromophores coordinated to efficiently transfer energy down an energy gradient and emit between 662 and 666 nm.
With no energy gradient built in, "the actual efficiency drops off after the fourth generation," or layer of branches, Moore says.
Thus thermal diffusivity is the parameter relating energy flux to energy gradient, whereas conductivity relates the energy flux to the temperature gradient.
An energy gradient can be visualized as energetic particles all concentrated in a particular place in some orderly manner.