enfilade


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Related to enfilade: defilade

enfilade

[′en·fə‚lād]
(ordnance)
To rake with gunfire; to fire down the length of a trench or line of troops.

enfilade

The alignment of a series of doors axially through a sequence of rooms.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not strictly true, because if a single column of enemy troops, as in a patrol, were advancing with their long axis perpendicular (or normal) to the front line, then enfilade engagement in this example would mean firing with the machine gun pointed at the first man in the single file, and thus it would also be frontal fire, and yet the long axis of the beaten zone would coincide with the long axis of the column of troops.
(21) Enfilade, es el termino frances que define la secuencia de compartimientos con las puertas alineadas en la misma posicion.
Indigo Jones and Enfilade are a couple of rivals who could test her this afternoon, but KATHRYN'S PET (3.15) will find today's weight of nine stone a feather burden compared to what she has been lumbered with over hurdles.
Lance-corporal Coltman, a stretcher-bearer, hearing that the wounded had been left behind during a retirement, on his own initiative, went forward alone in the face of fierce enfilade fire, found the wounded, dressed them, and on three successive occasions carried comrades on his back to safety, thus saving their lives.
The score of Prozession (1967) [1] consists almost entirely of various combinations of +, -, and = signs, stacked in orderly rows, and certainly does not look like music (see Example 1, which is a superimposition of the four performing parts, first two systems only; no score is included in the published version); its title means "procession," in the sense of a ceremonial parade or enfilade. As a musical score employing--at least in part--a symbolic, non-musical notation, it does, however, have antecedents, both among Stockhausen's works (Plus-Minus, Solo, Mikrophonie I and II, and to some extent Momente) and among the works of other composers (John Cage, Earle Brown, Morton Feldman, LaMonte Young, just to name a few).
The sense that we are being moved into position by hands other than our own is emphasized further in the series of illusionistic paintings that are now scattered, but a key group of which were painted for London houses in the 1660s With the Perspective from a Threshold, now at Dyrham Park, we are reminded it is not simply an extension of our space into an imaginary enfilade of rooms (as currently displayed at Dyrham, we see it across the space of a room barred of entry) but a privileged view onto a world we are not initially meant to see; it originally hung behind a closed door, to be 'accessed' suddenly for us (as Samuel Pepys was so privileged with this very picture) by the owner; again a startled dog reminds us that this is an intrusion we are effecting.
Perhaps they fear an enfilade of labor TV attack ads in their local districts branding them as enemies of education, the environment, and the elderly.
Whilst both writers punctiliously record the reception of various plays, I found in William Congreve the detailed sections on the interests which the audience brought to the theatre fascinating, especially that in house design, at a time when the change from a long enfilade to an arrangement around a central stair was the result of a desire for greater privacy.
Withering enfilade fire from The Pimple scythed through the ranks.
A good measure of the brand's peculiar vacuity might be the enfilade of prosaic residential high-rises that began sprouting along the West Side Highway in the late '90s, which fall at about the middle mark for the Trump Organization's accomplishments, quality-wise.
Traverses were made to counteract enfilade rifle-fire.