engine cylinder

engine cylinder

[′en·jən ‚sil·ən·dər]
(mechanical engineering)
A cylindrical chamber in an engine in which the energy of the working fluid, in the form of pressure and heat, is converted to mechanical force by performing work on the piston. Also known as cylinder.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sign exhibited is a painted copper alloy plaque from an engine cylinder at Kinneil House.
They also separate exhaust gasses and cooling water till they exit the riser because if water finds its way to the gas chamber, owing to a leakage in the water jacket, it will sweep into the engine cylinder and seize the piston with rust.
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, a company formed by the reorganisation of Fiat and Chrysler, has developed an aluminium alloy that exceeds the limitations of alloys currently used in vehicle engine cylinder heads.
The SinterCast technology, with 44 installations in 13 countries, is primarily used for the production of petrol and diesel engine cylinder blocks and exhaust components for passenger vehicles, medium-duty and heavy-duty cylinder blocks and heads for commercial vehicles, and industrial power engine components for marine, rail, off-road and stationary engine applications.
When the fuel is injected into the engine cylinder during the compression stroke, it does not have sufficient time to mix to with the air to form homogenous mixture [11].
Gocator Volume Checker solves this application by combining the Gocator 3210 snapshot sensor (35 [micro]m resolution) with custom built-in measurement tools to calculate the volume of engine cylinder heads and piston bowls.
The energy at the time of air separation, which began to flow into the engine cylinder from the entire mass, is superfluous.
In 1942, at the height of World War II, Bill Brodey was engaged in selling various tools and machines, including Joseph Sunnen honing machines used for honing engine cylinder bores.
The cause for LSPI is widely believed to be due to the liquid particles of the crankcase oil entering the engine cylinder [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9].
In the first, the air is compressed and fed to the reservoir while the second stage only is carried out in the engine cylinder. This engine may be petrol or diesel but, in all cases, the fuel is injected directly into the cylinder.
Spraying ether into engines will crack pistons, fracture cylinder sleeves, bend connecting rods and ruin engine cylinder heads.
Some 139,917 vehicles affected by the recall are at risk of localized overheating of the engine cylinder which could lead to an oil leak resulting in fire.