Enharmonic

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Enharmonic

 

(1) A term that refers to tones that are the same degree of the chromatic scale but are named and written differently (for example, F sharp and G flat), to intervals consisting of the same tones but “spelled” differently (for example, major sixth and diminished seventh), to chords that are tonally but not harmonically equivalent (for example, a diminished seventh chord in which 1–3 notes undergo an enharmonic substitution becomes one of the inversions of the other diminished seventh chords), or to keys that are tonally but not harmonically equivalent (F sharp major and G flat major). The concept of enharmonic tones came about as a result of equal temperament, in which the octave is divided into 12 equal semitones; it allows the composer to make use of enharmonic modulation, a change of key made by altering enharmonically one or two notes of a chord, thereby changing the chord’s harmonic meaning and inducing a different progression.

(2) One of the ancient Greek scale forms, a tonality that included intervals of approximately a quarter tone.

References in periodicals archive ?
A progression in rising sixths ends with an A#, which leads enharmonically to the initial tonic B[flat].
From his earliest songs, Heise was fond of "black-note" keys and unexpected harmonic shifts, although he was not given to chromatic voice leading and preferred to modulate enharmonically or by a common tone.
The intonation that Dauprat describes differs from modern intonation; for example, notes that are enharmonically the same are lower in a flat key than in a sharp key, a distinction that tends to disappear in our age of electronic tuners.
In accordance with the editorial principles of the Janacek Critical Edition, key signatures have been added and many passages enharmonically altered.
The Notes/Rests menu features a large number of global commands: not only are there three transposition options (which affect both notes and chord symbols), there are commands to delete redundant accidentals, to respell notes enharmonically, to renotate rhythms to make them conform to standard notational practice for the meter in use, to collect multiple measures of rests in a part and create multi-bar rests from them, to fill empty measures with whole rests, to remove gaps in the score, and to remove modifiers.