enrichment factor


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enrichment factor

[in′rich·mənt ‚fak·tər]
(nucleonics)
The ratio of the abundance of a particular isotope in an enriched material to its abundance in the original material.
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Degree of anthropogenic impact estimated based on the enrichment factor (EF) * and potential contamination index ([C.
Whatever the formulation or the chosen processing conditions, the surface enrichment factor is lower than 2.
The isotopic enrichment factor for denitrification in the upper soil layer columns was -7.
In these sequences, enrichment factors of elements Re, Mo and U with respect to average shales were computed as follows:
Table 1: Enrichment factor of control and contaminated sites Element Control NPC BCS Street KUPP Ca 9.
The NTC vaccines contain novel DNA origins of replication that allow up to 3 times as much vaccine DNA to be produced during per cell - a critical cost and purity enrichment factor for the massive immunizations that will be needed to treat infectious diseases and cancer, according to NTC scientist Jim Williams.
Due to considerable influence of local enrichment factors, the application of redox-sensitive elements as indicators of palaeoredox conditions of seawater is limited in the Turisalu Fm.
Research indicates that jobs higher in enrichment factors result in higher satisfaction; however, research also indicates that enriched jobs require more training time and result in slightly higher anxiety and stress (Michael, 1988).
Given that the concentration of these cells or molecules can be very low compared to other commonly present cell types or molecules, one needs enrichment factors of 1 to 10,000 or 1 to million.
The figure compares the enrichment factors of chloride (Cl), potassium (K), and borate (B) in the precipitator dust.