enstatite chondrite

enstatite chondrite

(en -stă-tÿt) See chondrite.

enstatite chondrite

[′en·stə‚tīt ′kän‚drīt]
(geology)
A type of chrondritic meteorite consisting almost entirely of enstatite, with metal inclusions that may be abundant and are usually low in nickel.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
6]) and one enstatite chondrite meteorite (Indarch [EH4]).
4]), a new mineral from ordinary and enstatite chondrites.
The new mineral, dubbed "Wassonite," was discovered inside the Yamato 691 enstatite chondrite meteorite by American researchers from NASA as well as scientists from Japan and South Korea.
The main subclass of these non-metallic stony meteorites (called chondrites as a category) that is thought to have made up Earth is called enstatite chondrites.
This composition is similar to that expected from partial melts of enstatite chondrites, a rare type of meteorite that formed at high temperatures in highly reducing (low oxygen) conditions in the inner solar system.
But M asteroids also mimic the spectra of silicate-dominated, metal-poor meteorites called enstatite chondrites.
Scientists had thought that most of the bodies that merged to make Earth formed from a narrow zone in space and were similar to each other, belonging to a subclass of meteorites called enstatite chondrites.
They compared these to meteorite samples, particularly enstatite chondrites and another type called enstatite achondrites.
The results suggest that a mixture of chondrites, rather than enstatite chondrites alone, probably combined to create the Earth.
Planetary scientists further classify chondritic IDPs according to the degree of their oxidation, yielding carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites.
This spectrum was then compared with that of meteorites found on Earth that have been extensively studied in the laboratory and only one type of meteorite, enstatite chondrites, was found to have properties that matched Lutetia over the full range of colours.
Enstatite chondrites are known to be material that dates from the early Solar System, and they are thought to have formed close to the young Sun and to have been a major building block in the formation of the rocky planets, in particular the Earth, Venus and Mercury.