entablature


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entablature

(ĕntăb`ləcho͝or), the entire unit of horizontal members above the columns or pilasters in classical architecture—Greek, Roman or Renaissance. The height of the entablature in relation to the column supporting it varies with the three orders, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian, but in Roman and Renaissance interpretations it is generally about one fourth the column height. The entablature's component members are the architravearchitrave
, in architecture, principal beam and lowest member of the classical entablature, the other main members of which are the frieze and the cornice. Its position is directly above the columns, and it extends between them, thus carrying the upper members of the order (see
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, which rests directly upon the abacus, or top member of the column cap; the friezefrieze,
in architecture, the member of an entablature between the architrave and the cornice or any horizontal band used for decorative purposes. In the first type the Doric frieze alternates the metope and the triglyph; that of the other orders is plain or sculptured.
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; and the cornicecornice
, molded or decorated projection that forms the crowning feature at the top of a building wall or other architectural element; specifically, the uppermost of the three principal members of the classic entablature, hence by extension any similar crowning and projecting
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, or topmost member. Essentially the entablature is a development from the primitive lintel, which spans two posts and supports the ends of the roof rafters. In Renaissance and modern designs the entablature is also used upon a wall as the crowning member or as a horizontal band, irrespective of columns.

Entablature

The superstructure composed of an architrave immediately above the columns, central frieze, and upper projecting cornice, consisting of a series of moldings. The proportions and detailing are different for each order, and they are strictly prescribed.

entablature

[en′tab·lə·chər]
(architecture)
A unit consisting of the architrave, frieze, and cornice of a wall.

entablature

entablature (Ionic)
1. In Classical architecture and its derivatives, an elaborate horizontal band and molding supported by columns; horizontally divided into three basic elements:architrave (the lowest member),frieze (the middle member), andcornice (the uppermost member). The proportions and detailing of an entablature are different for each order, and are strictly prescribed.
2. Any similar construction that crowns a wall, window, or doorway.

entablature

Architect
1. the part of a classical temple above the columns, having an architrave, a frieze, and a cornice
2. any construction of similar form
References in periodicals archive ?
Golvin and Khannoussi 2005, 141-143 provide an extremely useful chart of all the entablature blocks, including a photograph of "Mesopotamia." They report that Syria and Hispania are now missing.
But, from a distance, coherence is retained by a continuous abstracted entablature that ties all the smaller forms together and prepares for the shallow domes above.
Such hunting of sources, if occasionally eliciting qualified rather than ready assent, is always measured and based on careful discussion of context: Jones' library, learning and travel were extensive; Rubens was in London in 1629-30; Jones had been to Genoa and commented on building there; he owned a book of capitals and entablature details by Ligorio.
Add the arched, two storey windows and heraldic entablature and you could be looking at a palazzo on the European 'Grand Tour'.
He tried out many suffering faces before settling on the images for The Seven Words, 1898, a lineup of seven self-portraits as Jesus topped by a fake entablature inscribed with Christ's dying words.
Perched on the central entablature are the surviving lodges at Oakly Park and Lough Crew and the uncompleted National Monument on Calton Hill, Edinburgh.
Original architectural treasures still doing service include the 17th century oak staircase, some fine oak floors and doors and a magnificent stone fireplace with entablature, frieze, curved engravings and herring bone brick back - created for the upper Great Chamber of the house, now the master bedroom.
These debunking juxtapositions were a little obvious; yes, Japan is a twentieth-century society, and to photograph a liquor-stuffed bar and call it "Temple" - it has a traditional Japanese entablature - is a cheap shot.
The privileged location has been a selling point for nearly 300 years, a datestone recording the year 1717 and the initials WHL The house is built of local Cotswold stone in coursed ashlar with some quality detail including decorated pilasters, entablature with dentil cornice and mullioned and transomed windows.
The quotation "Tota Pulcra es amica mea et macula no(n) est in te' ('Thou art all fair, my love, there is no spot in thee'; Song of Solomon, IV, 7) was a standard verse applied to Immaculist iconography in the fifteenth century and is suitably presented here by King Solomon, who stands above the entablature. Opposite is King David, who presents the quotation "Queretur pecata illus no(n) invenietur" ('Seek out his wickedness till thou find none'; Psalms, x, 15).