entablature


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entablature

(ĕntăb`ləcho͝or), the entire unit of horizontal members above the columns or pilasters in classical architecture—Greek, Roman or Renaissance. The height of the entablature in relation to the column supporting it varies with the three orders, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian, but in Roman and Renaissance interpretations it is generally about one fourth the column height. The entablature's component members are the architravearchitrave
, in architecture, principal beam and lowest member of the classical entablature, the other main members of which are the frieze and the cornice. Its position is directly above the columns, and it extends between them, thus carrying the upper members of the order (see
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, which rests directly upon the abacus, or top member of the column cap; the friezefrieze,
in architecture, the member of an entablature between the architrave and the cornice or any horizontal band used for decorative purposes. In the first type the Doric frieze alternates the metope and the triglyph; that of the other orders is plain or sculptured.
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; and the cornicecornice
, molded or decorated projection that forms the crowning feature at the top of a building wall or other architectural element; specifically, the uppermost of the three principal members of the classic entablature, hence by extension any similar crowning and projecting
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, or topmost member. Essentially the entablature is a development from the primitive lintel, which spans two posts and supports the ends of the roof rafters. In Renaissance and modern designs the entablature is also used upon a wall as the crowning member or as a horizontal band, irrespective of columns.

Entablature

The superstructure composed of an architrave immediately above the columns, central frieze, and upper projecting cornice, consisting of a series of moldings. The proportions and detailing are different for each order, and they are strictly prescribed.

entablature

[en′tab·lə·chər]
(architecture)
A unit consisting of the architrave, frieze, and cornice of a wall.

entablature

entablature (Ionic)
1. In Classical architecture and its derivatives, an elaborate horizontal band and molding supported by columns; horizontally divided into three basic elements:architrave (the lowest member),frieze (the middle member), andcornice (the uppermost member). The proportions and detailing of an entablature are different for each order, and are strictly prescribed.
2. Any similar construction that crowns a wall, window, or doorway.

entablature

Architect
1. the part of a classical temple above the columns, having an architrave, a frieze, and a cornice
2. any construction of similar form
References in periodicals archive ?
has restored the building to its prewar state and transformed it into fashionable lofts, preserving the white stone pilasters and entablature, red brick Corinthian columns and arches and wrought-iron balconies.
Roughly 96 meters of three successive outpourings of lava are exposed in the quarry, all of which dip to the northwest at 10 to 15 degrees, contain numerous high-angle faults, and exhibit the classic colonnade and entablature joint pattern (Laskowich and Puffer, 1990).
The post has a base and a shaft crowned by a capital which joins to the topping called entablature.
of the cracking entablature at the architrave's cusp crumbling
Many of the entablature friezes in the entrances have collapsed with time, and the sandstone blocks bearing them are now buried in the piles of stone inside and outside the Bayon outer gallery walls.
IT looks, to my inexpert eye, not unlike a wedding cake, a faintly Baroque concoction of royal icing, all fluted, piped columns and chamfers, cornices and cresting, not to mention entablature, pediment and frieze.
Da Castello was also a collector of manuscripts and the builder of the palace now known as Palazzo Prosperi-Sacrati, famed for the portal with its entablature held aloft by putti.
To use architecture to buttress this point, I argue, although explaining details of the entablature some architectural historians hold the view that form follows function, Horst Woldemar Janson (1913-1982), the legendary art historian, counter argues that form precedes function in architecture.
The town's signature Roman columns--monumental Corinthian columns topped by an elaborately carved entablature, perched on a hill above the road from Geneva--were placed there in the late 1950s, and are thought to have originally been a part of the portico of the forum's area sacra.
He proudly placed his signature in the broken entablature in the left foreground.
In the same way that Charles Jencks has identified the self-conscious classical architecture, with its principal columns and entablature, with European fascism (Jencks 1987, 46), so do the dome and minaret become the universal properties of Islamic fundamentalism.
soaring classical columns and entablature of the city's