entail

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entail,

in law, restriction of inheritance to a limited class of descendants for at least several generations. The object of entail is to preserve large estates in land from the disintegration that is caused by equal inheritance by all the heirs and by the ordinary right of free alienation (disposal) of property interests. Legal devices similar to entail were known in Roman law and in all the countries of Europe. In England the entail became common in the early 13th cent., and in its most usual form was a conveyance by a grantor (owner) of real property to a grantee and the "heirs of his body," i.e., his lawful offspring, in successive generations. In the inheritance the rule of primogenitureprimogeniture,
in law, the rule of inheritance whereby land descends to the oldest son. Under the feudal system of medieval Europe, primogeniture generally governed the inheritance of land held in military tenure (see feudalism; knight).
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 was observed. The subsequent development of the entail reflects a continuing struggle between the effort to preserve large estates and the need for free alienation. By the mid-13th cent. the courts interpreted the birth of a live baby as the satisfaction of a condition that vested the grantee with the power of alienation. This result was overcome by the statute De donis conditionalibus [conditional gifts] (1285), which gave effect to the grantor's intent. In time the grantee was able to get control of the property despite the statutory prohibition by use of the finefine.
1 In criminal law, sum of money exacted by a lawful tribunal as punishment for a crime. In the case of misdemeanors and minor infractions of the law, convicted persons ordinarily have the alternative of paying a fine or undergoing a short term of imprisonment.
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 and other technical legal devices. Current English law permits the holder of entailed property (either real or personal) to dispose of it by deeddeed,
in law, written document that is signed and delivered by which one person conveys land or other realty (see property) to another. A deed may assure the extent of the conveying party's ownership or, if the party is uncertain of the precise extent, he issues a quitclaim (i.e.
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; otherwise the entail persists. In the United States for the most part entails are either altogether prohibited or limited to a single generation.

entail

1. Engraved or carved work.
2. Intaglio; inlay.

entail

Property law
a. the restriction imposed by entailing an estate
b. an estate that has been entailed
References in periodicals archive ?
If you cancel the entailments of (8) you cancel (8a), but (8b) still sticks around.
His notion of "implicitness"--the view that "our values have entailments we cannot anticipate"--seems to me closely linked to his choice of the noun "promise.
2) For him, an entity a derives its logical form from that of b if (A) a and b share the same logical form, and (B) it is psychologically impossible for us humans to recognize the entailment relations of a without previously having grasped b (Stainton 2006, p.
The inner structure and the main entailments of each of these simple metaphors will be discussed in the followings.
Tennant's Frobenian account does not subject the members of [DELTA] to closure of knowledge over known entailments.
The financial entailments of looking after Michael's estate are enormous.
These participles exhibit a pure aspectual distinction between ongoing and completion that is independent of the temporal entailments contributed by a finite verb.
He has written a book that makes a leisurely, albeit rigorous, case: "The conceptual metaphors of anatomy and the analogies of the microcosm coalesce in the allegorical threshold figure and the figurative design of The Purple Island, providing what is not only a coherent understanding of anatomy, but also a consistent, figuratively complex image, emblem, or speaking picture of anatomy, which explores the shared entailments and significant metaphorical connotations of islands, bodies, and buildings to an extent that is unprecedented in anatomy textbooks in its systematicity, coherence, and persistence" (472).
Semantic language, Rosen noted, 'by its very nature imputes hordes of entailments to the ambience, without going dramatically astray.
At this point we can trace out a series of entailments of the HOMEOSTASIS metaphorical structure:
These studies utilize a cluster analysis process wherein the various entailments of a metaphor are grouped together into common families.