enterococci

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Related to enterococcus: Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium

enterococci

[‚en·tə·rə′käk·ē]
(microbiology)
Spherical bacteria in short chains.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acquisition of rectal colonization by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus among intensive care unit patients treated with piperacillin-tazobactam versus those receiving cefepime-containing antibiotic regimens.
Key words Enterococcus faecalis--Enterococcus faecium--high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR)--nosocomial infections--vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE)
1994) apud Cerqueira (1999), para complementar os laudos microbiologicos fornecidos em analises de aguas, no sentido de definir tanto a poluicao fecal quanto a possibilidade de sua origem, utilizam-se os Enterococcus, bacterias Gram positivas em forma de cocos de, aproximadamente, 1 mm de diametro, que se apresentam em cadeias e incluem as especies Enterococcus avium, E.
coli and/or enterococcus criteria corresponding to an illness rate of no more than 14 per 1,000 swimmers, and has recommended using criteria corresponding to an illness rate of 8 per 1,000 swimmers for fresh water that is heavily used for swimming (9).
a linear relationship was established between enterococcus density and the frequency of swimming associated gastroenteritis per 1000 persons (Salas 1989).
By contrast, the overall infection rate of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus was relatively low (5%), and ranged from 4% in 1999 to 7% in 2003.
coli accounted for fewer than half of UTIs, but enterococcus caused up to 20% of UTIs, said Dr.
The Environmental Protection Agency recommends a safe standard for enterococcus to be no more than 158 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters of water.
Q What is the difference between Enterococcus and group D streptococcus?
Culture of the pleural fluid grew Enterococcus faecalis.
The model specifically considers bacteria, such as the enterococcus gut microbe, that spread easily from person to person.
The genus Enterococcus is of particular medical relevance because of its increased incidence as a cause of disease, and because the available antibiotic therapies are being compromised by the bacteria's growing resistance to antibiotics.