enter

(redirected from enters)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

enter

The act of entering data into the computer. After a line of text is typed, pressing the Enter key, also called the "Return key," causes the computer to input the data. See Enter key.
References in classic literature ?
When the clock began to strike, a burly professor entered, was received with a round of applause, moved swiftly down the center aisle, said "Gentlemen," and began to talk as he climbed his pulpit steps; and by the time he had arrived in his box and faced his audience, his lecture was well under way and all the pens were going.
He has been in rigid bondage so long that the large liberty of the university life is just what he needs and likes and thoroughly appreciates; and as it cannot last forever, he makes the most of it while it does last, and so lays up a good rest against the day that must see him put on the chains once more and enter the slavery of official or professional life.
The queen entered her oratory, which was lighted by a single lamp of Venetian crystal, She saw D'Artagnan, who stood expecting her.
The queen entered and D'Artagnan remained at the door.
"Enter, gentlemen," said Laporte, "since the queen desires you so to do."
Far beyond the door the heads of those who were not able to enter could be seen, all craning to their utmost height to try and see.
D'Artagnan saw it all through an opening he had made in the curtain, and in the very first man who entered he recognized Planchet.
"Yes," repeated the leader in a whisper, "God bless his majesty!" and all these men, who had entered enraged, passed from anger to pity and blessed the royal infant in their turn.
They all bowed, and retired by degrees as noiselessly as they had entered. Planchet, who had been the first to enter, was the last to leave.
At last she entered on the grounds of the Castle, at a spot from which the windows of the turret were dimly visible, without having seen again any sign of Lady Arabella.
When Mimi entered the dark hall and felt her way up the staircase, still, as she believed, following Lady Arabella, the latter kept on her way.
Then, taking her courage in both hands, she boldly pushed the door and entered. As she did so, her heart sank, for now she was face to face with a difficulty which had not, in her state of mental perturbation, occurred to her.