entrance

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entrance

Theatre the coming of an actor or other performer onto a stage

Entrance

Any passage that affords entry into a building; an exterior door, vestibule or lobby.

What does it mean when you dream about an entrance?

Entrances, as the name suggests, often symbolize entering into a new stage of life. Entryways into one’s home indicate entering more deeply into oneself. Entrances into caves, basements, or some other underground chamber may symbolize entering into the unconscious. Blocked or locked entrances may show difficulties or fears associated with entering.

entrance

[′en·trəns]
(civil engineering)
The seaward end of a channel, harbor, and so on.
(computer science)
The location of a program or subroutine at which execution is to start. Also known as entry point.
(engineering)
A place of physical entering, such as a door or passage.
(naval architecture)
The part of a ship's underwater hull which is forward of the amidships.

entrance

The point of entry into a building: an exterior door, a vestibule, or a lobby.
References in periodicals archive ?
It doesn't matter--I had her in a trance and I has/found their joint state 3 of entrancement.
It is precisely that capacity for reverie and entrancement, for "mindlessness", that fuels the ascent.
In its more benign forms, it is a lackluster life of empty work, alternating with soul-numbing entrancement to the television each night alter work because one is too exhausted and soul-drained to do anything else.
When their entrancement helps them miss a near-death experience with a taxi, the boys believe the dead popster was acting as their guardian angel.
Instead,at 16,having underachieved in her GCSEs, she set off for Barcelona on the strength of half-decent Spanishand an entrancement with the city's mythology.
enabling entrancement, the roots of identity and both societal and
Certainly during the sequences of the "Vision" in which the speaker's guide and interlocutor, namely Rousseau or "what was once Rousseau," recounts the story of his own entrancement (305-525), we find the poem spiralling into perhaps the most extended and extravagant aesthetic figurations and experiences in this extravagant poet's brief career.
As Armstrong argues, the entrancement of Merlin is symbolic of the photographic process itself, where the subject is fixed in a frame where s/he will stand, bewitched and static, for ever--what Armstrong calls "the trancelike stillness of the gaze and the mute frozenness of the photograph" (p.
His sexual needs catered for in other ways, Louis continued to luxuriate in the web of entrancement that Pompadour had woven around him.
This entrancement propels Dasein into a burdensome moment of vision wherein Dasein may realize the possibility of being gripped by a questioning that interrogates the fundamental concepts of metaphysics submerged in Dasein's own essence.
After all, for almost sixty years-from the turn of the century to the break-up of the big studios, at the end of the fifties--going to the movies in this country has most often meant going to look at movie stars; and most often what that has meant is looking at evocative faces and bodies doing evocative things to produce and sustain a habitat necessary to entrancement; and most often what that entrancement has consisted of is a language of features, postures, and gestures, at most and at best an intricate poetics of both dance and dancelike expression.