Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peptide-T, an entry inhibitor first discovered in the 1980s but not studied as an anti-HIV drug until the late '90s, is also so well tolerated that codeveloper Pert says one possible use for the drug would be for patients on so-called drug holidays--periods when they stop taking anti-HIV drugs in order to reduce toxic side effects.
The debut of entry inhibitors has been eagerly awaited because of preclinical hints that they may be highly effective and have few side effects.
With a far greater understanding of the HIV cell entry process, we can now envisage HIV entry inhibitors as whole new classes of drugs for the future.
The four new anti-HIV drugs that came out in 2003 are Fuzeon, part of a new class of drugs called entry inhibitors or fusion inhibitors; the protease inhibitors Reyataz and Lexiva; and the reverse transcriptase inhibitor Emtriva.
We also saw data about other new classes of drugs, including many other entry inhibitors, CCR-5 inhibitors, and one drug from a completely new class that may be a viral assembly inhibitor.
This could include new class of drugs for entry inhibitors, coreceptor antagonists and fusion inhibitors.
RITA: Some people view the entry inhibitors in development as the next great hope in HIV treatments, possibly replacing some classes of antiretroviral agents as first-line treatments: a second-generation HAART, if you will.
Classes of entry inhibitors include coreceptor inhibitors (these block HIV's interaction with coreceptors such as the chemokines CCR5 and CXCR4) and fusion inhibitors (these prevent the virus from fusing with the cell membrane).
Among the new classes of drugs under study are HIV integrase inhibitors, which block the enzyme that HIV uses to incorporate its genetic material into human DNA, and HIV entry inhibitors, which prevent the virus from entering the cell.
Human Immunodeficiency Virus HIV Protease Inhibitors HIV Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors HIV Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors HIV Entry Inhibitors HIV Integrase Inhibitors Hepatitis C Virus Protease Inhibitors HCV Polymerase Nucleoside Inhibitors Other HCV Inhibitors Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitors Influenza, Hepatitis B, and Cytomegalovirus Inhibitors
The Second Collaborative Research Seminar on HIV and Other Viral Entry Inhibitors, May 3-5, 2002, The Waldorf Astoria, New York, NY The Macrae Group, 230 East 79th St, Suite 8E, NY 10021, 212-988-7732 212-7171222 macraegrp@binternet.
Doms, who also envisions using several classes of entry inhibitors simultaneously.