enuresis

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enuresis

involuntary discharge of urine, esp during sleep
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

enuresis

[‚en·yə′rē·səs]
(medicine)
Urinary incontinence, especially in the absence of organic cause.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Norgaard et al., in their review reported that when both parents were enuretic as children, their offspring had a 77% risk of having nocturnal enuresis.
Studies addressing the psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms accompanying enuresis and the sense of self in enuretic children have also been conducted, though the number of these studies is few (11-15).
[11-14] There is no study that has classified enuretic children using the recent classification (MNE and NMNE), indicating that children with daytime voiding and/or lower urinary tract symptoms are usually missed both in terms of diagnosis and treatment modalities.
The first case-control study in the review found that enuretic older children (10-12 years) and girls had lower self-esteem scores than younger children (8-9 years) and boys.
For instance, they labeled a child's enuretic struggles "sneaky wee" (p.
"Congress have no power to disarm the militia," Coxe wrote in The Pennsylvania Gazette, back before newspapers had become havens for screaming hoplophobes and enuretic Fourth Estate Fifth Columnists.
Objective: In the treatment of monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MN E), enuretic alarm devices (EADs) are the first recommended treatment option.
This probably explains why many clinicians, including myself, find that it is usually easy to induce hypnosis in enuretic children.
The National Health Examination Survey also reported that as many as 25% of boys and 15% of girls were enuretic at the age of 6 years, with as many as 8% of boys and 4% of girls still enuretic at the age of 12 years.
The first Issue contains four original articles covering the study of self-esteem in enuretic children through the Rorschach method, exploring the validity of graphology with the Rorschach test, alternative ways of organizing the sensory universe, and using the defense mechanism test to aid in understanding the personality of senior executives and the implications for their careers.