Envy

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Envy

See also Jealousy.
Amneris
envious of Aida. [Ital. Opera: Verdi, Aida, Westerman, 325]
Cinderella’s sisters
envious of their sister’s beauty. [Folklore: Barnhart, 246]
green
symbol of envy; “the green-eyed monster.” [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357; Br. Lit.: Othello]
Iago
Othello’s ensign who, from malevolence and envy, persuades Othello that Desdemona has been unfaithful. [Br. Lit.: Othello]
Joseph’s brothers
resented him for Jacob’s love and gift. [O.T.: Genesis 37:4]
Lensky
envy of Onegin leads to his death in a duel. [Russ. Opera: Tchaikovsky, Eugene Onegin, Westerman, 395–397]
Lisa
envious of Amina; tries unsuccessful stratagems. [Ital. Opera: Bellini, The Sleepwalker, Westerman, 128–130]
Snow White’s stepmother
envious of her beauty, queen orders Snow White’s death. [Ger. Fairy Tale: Grimm, 184]
References in periodicals archive ?
We think it is likely that the input--output envy group was the least helpful because the envied thought they deserved their benefits and believed that others would accept that fact.
the envied members of the venturing programs: Brian, Martin, James, Andrew, and Colin), those who observed envy emerging in the organizational setting (Sara), and those who observed the existence of resentment toward the venturing programs (Chris).
In experiments, he and his colleagues made some people feel like they would be maliciously envied, by telling them they would receive an award of five euros-sometimes deserved based on the score they were told they'd earned on a quiz, sometimes not.
He shows that religion liberates the envious one from envy, and the envied from guilt and fear, by giving hope for the future to all.
When I cooled down, I realised what I envied him for was not the money as such, or even the bottle to ask for it, it was the freedom it bought him.
Any job in the media was named as the most envied profession although the survey was carried out before the Hutton Report was published.
However, regardless of the form in which envy is expressed, its basis will always be an unfavourable contrast with the envied party.
This happened because these other areas envied the success of science and wanted to share in its prestige.
Rather, they truly intend goodwill, reflecting either a determination to improve themselves or admiration for the envied colleague.
Envy has typically been regarded as a destructive emotion that harms the envied one (Miceli & Castelfranchi, 2007; Smith & Kim, 2007) and induces impulsive behavior (Crusius & Mussweiler, 2012) and self-regulatory depletion (Hill, DelPriore, & Vaughan, 2011).