environmental stress cracking


Also found in: Acronyms.

environmental stress cracking

[in¦vī·ərn¦mənt·əl ′stres ‚krak·iŋ]
(mechanics)
The susceptibility of a material to crack or craze in the presence of surface-active agents or other factors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investigating the role of anionic surfactant and polymer morphology on the environmental stress cracking (ESC) of high-density polyethylene.
The cause of this accident is considered as the strength decrease by hydrolysis reaction of resin and by environmental stress cracking.
A principal consideration in the relatively high failure rate associated with environmental stress cracking is the widespread lack of awareness and understanding of the interaction between plastic materials and chemicals, particularly organic-based chemicals, which are so prevalent in manufacturing, commercial, and household settings.
In order to investigate the susceptibility of different materials or a number of chemical environments to environmental stress cracking or premature ruptures, it is possible to use monotonic creep tests (ref.
Optimization of Petaloid Base Dimensions and Process Operating Conditions to Minimize Environmental Stress Cracking in Injection Stretch Blow Moulded PET Bottles," PhD Thesis, RM1T University, Australia (2008).
This brings returns in faster processing, and also reduces internal stress that could cause environmental stress cracking of the finished caps.
The products resist soil stress, under-film moisture migration, environmental stress cracking, and mechanical damage from handling.
Fabrications are manufactured from 3/16 to 1 1/2" homogeneous polypropylene, a rugged, resilient material that is UV-stable and not subject to delamination or environmental stress cracking, per ASTM D-1693, also FM 4910 clean-room standards.
There was no sign of environmental stress cracking in the grafts, which has historically hampered the use of polyurethanes for long-term implantable devices such as vascular grafts.
It has been estimated that 15% of all failures of plastic materials in commercial use are related to environmental stress cracking (ESC) (3).
High levels of stress also lower a product's impact strength and can contribute to environmental stress cracking and diminished performance at high or cycling temperatures.
Polyether polyurethanes, while hydrolytically stable, are subject to oxidative degradation in several forms, including environmental stress cracking and metal ion oxidation.
Full browser ?