Eparchy

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Eparchy

 

(or diocese), a territorial unit of ecclesiastic administration in the Orthodox, Catholic, and Anglican churches, headed by a bishop. In Kievan Rus’ the division into eparchies was brought about under Grand Prince Vladimir Sviatoslavich in the tenth century, at which time they numbered not more than eight. Subsequently the division of Russia into eparchies corresponded roughly to the administrative division into provinces. By the early 19th century Russia had 36 independent eparchies, each headed by an eparchial bishop. At the present time the boundaries of the eparchies—where they exist—roughly correspond to the administrative division of the USSR into oblasts and republics.

References in periodicals archive ?
The 2006 survey included responses from 193 of the 195 dioceses and eparchies.
In 1965, the eparchies of Pittsburgh and Passaic reported a total of 467 converts.
Banned during the Soviet era, it was legalized in 1989 and had 12 eparchies and 1,166 communities, approximately 70 percent of them in the western part of the country.
The UOC-KP has 31 eparchies and 3,484 communities, approximately 60 percent of which are in the western part of the country.
Notzon, whose term as board chairman concludes after the June meeting, identified continuing the charter review and bringing the five abstaining eparchies into the audit as top priorities for his successor, Francesco C.
3 percent of the population) in 33 dioceses and eparchies grouped into five provinces; 175 orders and institutes of men and women religious.
These new ecclesiastical formations went through their own evolution and were finally established as distinct metropolitan sees in North America and eparchies or exarchates in the other countries of the diaspora, such as Argentina and Brazil.
Publication of the annual audit of dioceses and eparchies to determine how they are complying with the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People is intended to assure the Catholic faithful and the wider society that church leaders remain vigilant in their efforts to combat sex abuse of children by priests and other ministers.
Australia has 33 dioceses and eparchies and about 42 active bishops and auxiliary bishops.
which was one of two dioceses and five Eastern Catholic eparchies in the country that declined to participate in the national audit of compliance procedures mandated by the Essential Norms.
An audit report released April 11 and covering the period from July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010, showed that "management letters" had been issued to 55 of the 188 dioceses or eparchies participating in the annual compliance assessments by the Gavin Group.
This is the first time, however, that a significant number of dioceses--5 percent of the 195 dioceses and eparchies in the United States--have left the campaign in a single time frame.