excrescence

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Related to epenthesis: Anaptyxis, Svarabhakti

excrescence

a projection or protuberance, esp an outgrowth from an organ or part of the body
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

excrescence

[ek′skrē·səns]
(biology)
Abnormal or excessive increase in growth.
An abnormal outgrowth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a consequence, SA, like all other Arabic varieties, resorts to epenthesis or resyllabification in order to avoid the surfacing of onsetless syllables or complex onsets.
Epenthesis to break sC-sequences is contrary to NSE norms, but this is not regarded as a source of intelligibility problems.
Furthermore, languages rely on morphophonemic processes such as glide formation, vowel deletion, vowel coalescence and consonant (usually glide) epenthesis to resolve hiatus (see Casali, 1996, 1997).
From this all words here can be derived: Bangani, Deogari and Kashmiri display epenthesis (more on this below in section 13), but not Indus Kohistani and Romani.
* Epenthesis: There is no CVC (a Consonant, following Vowel, and then a Consonant) in China's ordinary speech structure.
Generalizations about processes (e.g., deletion, epenthesis, morpheme coalescence) and also minimality/maximality constraints (e.g., the strong preference for monosyllabicity) may be made at the level of the phonological word in sign languages.
Thus Hogg refers to Luick when discussing palatalisation (260-261,263,275), assibilation (272), assibilation of [sc] (271), fricative voicing (283-284), development of velars (289), gemination (294), consonant loss (297), epenthesis (298), assimilation (300-301), and consonant shifts (306).