Epicenter

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epicentre

(US), epicenter
the point on the earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake or underground nuclear explosion
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Epicenter

 

(1) The projection of the hypocenter of an earthquake onto the earth’s surface (seeHYPOCENTER). The location of the epicenter is determined from recordings by seismic stations, and the epicentral region is determined by the degree of destruction on the surface. Epicenter maps showing the magnitudes of earthquakes are used in seismic zoning. (See alsoEARTHQUAKES.)

(2) The projection onto the earth’s surface of the center of an atmospheric (underwater or underground) nuclear explosion.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

epicenter

[′ep·ə‚sen·tər]
(geology)
A point on the surface of the earth which is directly above the seismic focus of an earthquake and where the earthquake vibrations reach first.
(mathematics)
The center of a circle that generates an epicycloid or hypocycloid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Nepal earthquake, two stations were compared with a KATN accelerograph as relatively co-located--the distance between sensors was 6 km (NAST) and 10 km (KKN4), but with a similar epicentral azimuth.
Figure 6a, showing an amazingly periodic structural failure pattern in the epicentral Gemona region, suggests that, even if the importance of the causes such as the vulnerability (toughness) of each individual structure is accepted, it is not simple to systematically explain the generation of the alternate damage levels occurring in such a small spatial distance: If the structures built next to each other are subjected to more or less the identical (dominant types and frequency components of) seismic waves under very similar geological conditions, the structural damage should be, to some extent, also comparable.
The effects of an earthquake at any place depend directly on magnitude and inversely on epicentral distance.
Located on the Pacific coast, about 190 kilometers southwest of Tokyo, the five-reactor Hamaoka complex is known to be standing on an assumed epicentral area for a massive earthquake.
Mehrdad Mahdyiar, senior director of earthquake research for catastrophe modeler AIR Worldwide, has said insured losses "will not be significant given the low residential take-up rates and the relatively rural nature of the epicentral region."
Mehrdad Mahdyiar, senior director of earthquake research for catastrophe modeler AIR Worldwide has said insured losses "will not be significant given the low residential take-up rates and the relatively rural nature of the epicentral region."