epigastric region


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Related to epigastric region: umbilical region, Hypogastric region, epigastric hernia

epigastric region

[¦ep·ə¦gas·trik ‚rē·jən]
(anatomy)
The upper and middle part of the abdominal surface between the two hypochondriac regions. Also known as epigastrium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultrasonographic images of the abdominal nodules: (C) one located the right epigastric region and measuring 3.09cm in length, and (D) the other in the mesogastric region and measuring approximately 2.33cm in length.
Abdominal pain, which was mainly located in the epigastric region, was associated with retching and vomiting.
The repeat obstruction series was negative for obstruction, but there was a small right pleural effusion, ascites, and a paucity of gas in the epigastric region, which suggested a mass.
The pain started specifically from the epigastric region, then spread to the whole abdomen, and was accompanied by high temperature of about 39[degrees]C.
A 37-year-old man who had been alcoholic for 15 years presented to our hospital with complaints of abdominal pain in epigastric region for 3 months and melena for 2 days.
The eruption usually begins as verrucous papules in the inframammary or epigastric region that enlarge to 4 to 5 mm in diameter and coalesce to form a confluent plaque with a peripheral reticulated pattern.
The following were revealed at the abdomen examination: Hepatomegaly with palpable lump in the right hypochondriac and epigastric region, lump was 5 x 5 cm in size with relatively smooth surface without tenderness No evidence of splenomegaly.
On the 17th day of hospitalization, the patient suddenly developed increased abdominal pain (most intense in the epigastric region), increased shortness of breath, increased respiratory rate, and severe hypotension.
On palpation, a painful abdominal mass was identified in the epigastric region. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed an obstructive non-homogeneous abdominal mass, and a gastric tumour was suspected.
Two days after fever, he experienced pain in epigastric region of sever intensity without any relation to food, relieved slightly on bending forward without any radiation.
She was also complaining of a painless swelling at the epigastric region of approximately 1 month duration.
The clinical examination usually revealed mild tenderness in the epigastric region. It could not be ascertained with certainty as to how many patients had taken non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which could have contributed to the development of this acute exacerbation as majority of the patients were sages (sadhus) and illiterate people.