epigenotype

epigenotype

[‚ep·ə′jēn·ə‚tīp]
(genetics)
The total developmental system through which the adult form of an organism is realized, comprising the interactions among genes and between genes and the nongenetic environment.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) (12) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder which is complex and heterogeneous in both clinical phenotype and epigenotype.
Folic acid supplementation during the juvenile-pubertal period in rats modifies the phenotype and epigenotype induced by prenatal nutrition.
This study highlights the ability of prenatal alcohol exposure to alter the fetal epigenotype (albeit only at a specific locus) and, consequently, the adult phenotype.
How lifetimes shape epigenotype within and across generations.
Waddington, The Epigenotype, 1 ENDEAVOUR 18, 18 (1942).
It was established to develop integrated technologies that divulge an individual's epigenotype or Digital Phenotype(r), a digitized readout of DNA methylation patterns that describes whether a particular cell is healthy or not.
Epigenotype switching at the CD14 and CD209 genes during differentiation of human monocytes to dendritic cells.
Epigenomics GmbH and the Human Epigenome Consortium will develop integrated technologies that provide an individual's epigenotype or 'digital phenotype'.
Mechanisms of disease: the developmental origins of disease and the role of the epigenotype.
Molecular testing for PWS and AS has necessarily proceeded in a stepwise fashion to investigate both deletions and epigenotype (18-20).
The low variability in CpG methylation among the three germ layer tissues relative to high variability between individual animals indicates that the establishment of epigenotype at the [A.
This NoE identified 4 areas aiming at: 1) characterizing the molecular dynamics of epigenetic systems at the single molecule and cell level, 2) linking genotypes to epigenotypes, 3) investigating how environmental, developmental and metabolic signals act upon the epigenome, and 4) understanding epigenetic inheritance through replication, mitosis and meiosis.