epiglottis

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Related to epiglottic: epiglottic cartilage

epiglottis

(ĕp'əglŏt`ĭs): see larynxlarynx
, organ of voice in mammals. Commonly known as the voice box, the larynx is a tubular chamber about 2 in. (5 cm) high, consisting of walls of cartilage bound by ligaments and membranes, and moved by muscles. The human larynx extends from the trachea, or windpipe.
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epiglottis

[‚ep·ə′gläd·əs]
(anatomy)
A flap of elastic cartilage covered by mucous membrane that protects the glottis during swallowing.

epiglottis

a thin cartilaginous flap that covers the entrance to the larynx during swallowing, preventing food from entering the trachea
References in periodicals archive ?
9 mm (a 5 mm inner diameter [ID] tube is tight, but passable) with the ID of the space bounded by the epiglottic fins even smaller.
The mechanism for epiglottic and left pyriform fossa impingement detailed in our Results section has not previously been described, and thus no comparison with previous studies is possible.
0%) and noted that no patient had persistent epiglottic prolapse requiring epiglottoplasty.
In our series and in the series by Olney et al, (1) all surgical patients who had posterior epiglottic prolapse (type 3) ultimately required a tracheostomy to secure the airway.
Several varieties of epiglottic neoplasms have been described in the literature.
In this article, we describe the case of a newborn who presented with an epiglottic cyst that was later identified as a rudimentary pinna attached to the soft palate.
The infant was nasotracheally intubated, and examination revealed that an epiglottic cyst was present (figure 1).
During this action, the clinician assesses the pharyngeal squeeze, the timing of the swallow, epiglottic inversion (figures 1 and 2), and pooled secretions.
Many flaps and grafts have been used to achieve this goal; among them are nasal septal (7) and auricular cartilage, (8) epiglottic tissue, (9) thyroid cartilage, (10) costal cartilage, (11) sternocleidomastoid myoperiosteal flaps, (12) and hyoid bone.
Indirect laryngoscopy revealed the tumor stalk arising from the right epiglottic border.
In the late 19th century, Sutherland and Lack proposed that laryngomalacia is related to a delay in the normal development of cartilaginous support of the arytenoids and epiglottic tissues.
1) Epiglottic abscess is an uncommon sequela of acute epiglottitis, occurring in up to 4% of cases in adults.