epiglottis


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Related to epiglottis: epiglottitis

epiglottis

(ĕp'əglŏt`ĭs): see larynxlarynx
, organ of voice in mammals. Commonly known as the voice box, the larynx is a tubular chamber about 2 in. (5 cm) high, consisting of walls of cartilage bound by ligaments and membranes, and moved by muscles. The human larynx extends from the trachea, or windpipe.
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epiglottis

[‚ep·ə′gläd·əs]
(anatomy)
A flap of elastic cartilage covered by mucous membrane that protects the glottis during swallowing.

epiglottis

a thin cartilaginous flap that covers the entrance to the larynx during swallowing, preventing food from entering the trachea
References in periodicals archive ?
Fiberoptic laryngoscopy detected a small, white, polypoid lesion on the posterior aspect of the epiglottis (figure 1).
The cyst extended superiorly up to the tip of the epiglottis, medially overlying the glottic chink, and laterally filling the left piriform fossa.
Indirect laryngoscopy identified a single, round, cystic swelling that involved the valleculae and the anterior surface of the epiglottis. Both vocal folds were normal and mobile.
Schwannoma of the epiglottis: First report of a case.
Dewi Williams, consultant anaesthetist at DGRI, said: "Kirsty had a sudden and life-threatening illness, acute bacterial epiglottis, so rare that a clinician will see it only a few times in their career.
On endoscopic examination, it was found that there was a foreign body (root canal file stick) into the epiglottis (Fig.
Mucosal lumps extend throughout the supraglottic portion of the pharynx, including the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis and the posterior pharynx.
Additionally, they reported that resection of one arytenoid allows either the base of the tongue or suprahyoid epiglottis to form a tight laryngeal sphincter with the remaining arytenoid cartilage (10).
The epiglottis plays an important role in protecting the airway against food penetration by closing the laryngeal entrance during swallowing (3).
The otolaryngologist service performed a laryngoscopic examination, which revealed left side erythema and an edematous epiglottis and aryepiglottic folds consistent with acute epiglottitis (Figure 1).
There were blood clots covering both the arytenoids and epiglottis.