epigraph

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epigraph

a quotation at the beginning of a book, chapter, etc., suggesting its theme

Epigraph

 

since the 14th century, a quotation used to open a work of literature or part of a work. Sources for epigraphs are folk literature, the Bible, aphorisms, fiction, and letters. Sometimes writers compose their own epigraphs. The epigraph introduces a fresh point of view to the topic under consideration, elucidating its meaning and indicating the traditions with which the work is linked.

References in periodicals archive ?
Zevit pays special attention to unique epigraphic material, with distinct Sitz im Leben, found in sites such as a cave near Ein Gedi, Khirbet El-Qom, and Kuntillet 'Ajrid, and Khirbet Beit Lei, only three of which he classifies as cult locales, which he considers "from the perspective of a SPEAKING model of ethnographic communicative acts" (p.
Comparing the evolution of suffix elements of Yahweh (yhw, yh, yw) isolated in names from biblical texts to those from epigraphic texts, they found that names provide information about the likely origins of some of the historical texts of the Bible (Andersen and Hess 2007: 1-14).
Second, though the epigraphic chapters are better grounded in actual diplomacy, here, as Patterson acknowledges, "the specific circumstances" of introducing ancestral forefather myths into the diplomacy generally remain unstated in the inscriptions and as such "beyond our reach" (110-111).
It is a must-read for every student of Paul's Romans and early Christian history, a marvelous achievement, based on detailed knowledge of the sources, literary, epigraphic, and archaeological.
In support of this thesis he invites us to consider what we would know about the Jews if we had only the testimonies of pagan authors and epigraphic and papyrological evidence.
John Miksic first offers an overview of the role field archaeology has played in establishing provenance and dates for Southeast Asian jewellery; alongside an epigraphic identification, this is surely the most important, because primary, context we need to have for Javanese gold finds.
As could be said of the two previous volumes (see JTS, NS, 45 (1994), 701-704 and Journal for the Study of Judaism 25 (1994), 320-23), this work can be regarded as a very valuable asset to both Judaic and epigraphic studies; moreover, the book is beautifully produced (although on the final 200 pages in my copy the printing is often quite pale and faded) and it is remarkably free from printer's errors (but see 'eon' for 'Leon' at p.
Concluding a three-volume series on the inscriptions that already includes an epigraphic glossary and a catalogue in inscriptions, Buchmann offers a preliminary overview of epigraphic Lanna Thai in Fak Kham script.
A brief description of the grotto and of each of the monuments--the Augusteum, the Court of Pan and the Nymphs, the Temple of Zeus, the Court of Nemesis, the Tripartite building, and the Temple of Pan and the Goats--provides the reader with an overview of the chronology of these constructions, as well as of the architectural, epigraphic, and numismatic evidence for the sculptures that once graced the sanctuary.
Dossey's analysis represents an integrated approach, and the evidence considered here encompasses a wide range of material and integrates the archaeological evidence with the epigraphic and literary sources.
Specialists in the part of the world that is now occupied Iraq in its prehistoric and protohistoric period filter their research, mostly of the primary epigraphic research, through issues of current interest such as ecology, productivity, power relations, economics, epistemology, scientific paradigms, and complexity.
Some make excellent use of archaeological data: epigraphic evidence for Jewish defectors, the Tobiad palace at 'Iraq al Amir, ossuaries as evidence for Jewish proselytes, Masada, the social context of the Mishnah, and so on.