Epimedium

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Epimedium

 

a genus of perennial rhizomatous herbs of the family Berberidaceae. The leaves are compound. The small, variously colored flowers are in simple or compound inflorescences. The petals, which are arranged crosswise, usually have spurs or hoods and are partly covered by petaloid stipules. There are from 20 to 25 species, distributed in Eurasia and Northwest Africa. The USSR has four species, growing in Transcaucasia and the Far East. Some species are used as ornamentals, especially in rocky places. Ornamentals include E. alpinum, which grows in the Alps and on the Balkan Peninsula; E. pinnatum and E.colchicum, which occur in Transcaucasia and Iran; and E.grandiflorum, which is found in Korea, Japan, and Northeast China.

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Intestinal absorption mechanisms of prenylated flavonoids present in the heat-processed Epimedium koreanum Nakai (Yin Yanghuo).
The major components in Epimediums included Icariin, Epimedin A, Epimedin B, and Epimedin C.
Epimedium, above hails from Europe, the US and Asia, while astilbe, below was first found in Asia
When planting epimediums among tree roots, add plenty of humus-rich material around the roots but avoid strong manure, as epimediums in their natural habitat would be fed by leaf litter.
Don't just leave fallen leaves because they may hide tiny treasures like erythroniums, epimedium grandiflorum and versicolor.
After my rose garden was tidy, I headed back to the epimediums and snipped them over.
As a woodland plant, they associate best with wood anemones, hostas, epimediums, and the ubiquitous periwinkles and Lady's Mantle (Alchemilla mollis).
Perennials which flower in spring and early summer, including epimediums, lily-of the- valley and rhizomatous bearded irises, should be divided immediately after they have finished flowering.
munitum, sometimes called the sword fern because its tall fronds are unusually long and narrow and it still looks remarkably fresh in winter, making a wonderful contrast against snowdrops and epimediums, which like the same conditions.
PULMONARIA (LUNGWORT) ulmonarias are an integral part of the spring tapestry and are great companions to snowdrops, epimediums and aconites.