Epimedium

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Epimedium

 

a genus of perennial rhizomatous herbs of the family Berberidaceae. The leaves are compound. The small, variously colored flowers are in simple or compound inflorescences. The petals, which are arranged crosswise, usually have spurs or hoods and are partly covered by petaloid stipules. There are from 20 to 25 species, distributed in Eurasia and Northwest Africa. The USSR has four species, growing in Transcaucasia and the Far East. Some species are used as ornamentals, especially in rocky places. Ornamentals include E. alpinum, which grows in the Alps and on the Balkan Peninsula; E. pinnatum and E.colchicum, which occur in Transcaucasia and Iran; and E.grandiflorum, which is found in Korea, Japan, and Northeast China.

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Intestinal absorption mechanisms of prenylated flavonoids present in the heat-processed Epimedium koreanum Nakai (Yin Yanghuo).
The major components in Epimediums included Icariin, Epimedin A, Epimedin B, and Epimedin C.
After my rose garden was tidy, I headed back to the epimediums and snipped them over.
Carol Klein surrounded by epimediums PICTURES: Jonathan Buckley/Getty ask Carol QOUR lilies have just come and some of the scales have broken off.
There are Asiatic primulas, bergenias, pulmonarias and epimediums to name just a few.
At their feet try epimediums, which are extremely tolerant of dry shade.
There are epimediums from Europe, America and Asia, including inter-continental hybrids Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens', often mistakenly referred to as a grass, is a member of the asparagus family.
The best time to divide plants is autumn, when they are dormant, and spring, when they are just including bamboos should be divided in early spring, while perennials which flower in spring and early summer, such as lily-of-the-valley, epimediums and rhizomatous bearded irises, should be divided as soon as they have finished flowering.
Grasses including bamboos should be divided in early spring, while perennials which flower in spring and early summer, such as lily-of-the-valley, epimediums and rhizomatous bearded irises, should be divided as soon as they have finished flowering.