Epiphenomenon

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Epiphenomenon

 

an adjunct to a phenomenon; a secondary phenomenon that accompanies other phenomena but has no influence on them. Some adherents of voluntarism, such as E. von Hartmann and F. Nietzsche, regarded consciousness as an epiphenomenon—an implement of the unconscious world will—while several natural-science materialists, including T. Huxley, viewed it as a consequence of the activity of the higher nervous system.

References in periodicals archive ?
1) Ubiquitous bioelectrical phenomena in the human body, which are either ignored or treated as epiphenomena.
What this means is that instead of explicating what we commonly mean and how we have distinguished justice and injustice in our experience, Rawls takes our common sense intuitions about justice as epiphenomena whose hidden structure he intends to explore.
From the vantage point of what might be called socio-cognitivism, language and, by implication, meaning are approached as dynamic, three-dimensional epiphenomena of human (re)cognition, specific communicative context, and historical socio-cultural context (cf.
Specifically, Phaedo seems to have thought that nonrational desires were ineliminable epiphenomena of the body, that reason was something distinct, and that the purpose of philosophy was its "cure" and "purification.
They are unapologetic about regarding museums as part of the epiphenomena of cultural studies.
The sequels of Ramism--method and its epiphenomena, which identify Ramism as an important symptom of man's changing relationship to the universe--connect with Ramist dialectic directly but with rhetoric only negatively or not at all.
His book is a straightforward, well-written account of "An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror"--that is, of the notorious Operation Ajax and what we may now recognize as its epiphenomena.
40, 51, 84), Skinner held that only motor behavior counted, and that "emotional responses were really irrelevant; they were only collateral events, epiphenomena, which 'have no explanatory force' with respect to behavior and operant conditioning.
This is important not just because The Industry Standard and its cousins were epiphenomena of Wired but because the two define differing approaches to the digital revolution.
The absence of critical judgment, the demands of competition, and the unremitting pressure of deadlines helps create the kind of media epiphenomena that characterized the cloning of Eve and the earlier announcement of the creation of cloned human embryos by the Massachusetts company Advanced Cell Technology.
For the canon, important epiphenomena include the ways its forms can oppress and exclude, or be liberating.
In Chomsky's politics such events are epiphenomena to incorporate within his decades-long lecture and established intellectual model.