episcopacy


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episcopacy

1. government of a Church by bishops
2. another word for episcopate
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, bishops and their defenders more likely resorted to historical rather than spiritual grounds in their defence of episcopacy. (6) Restoration churchmen found compelling statements of episcopal power in textual evidence, which stressed the distinctively reformed character of the restored English bishops.
In a final brief epilogue, the author usefully reminds us again of her thesis: that ecclesial reform, for which Norman churchmen traditionally have received credit, was already under way before the Conquest; and that even if William quickly replaced the Anglo-Saxon episcopacy with Normans--and every Anglo-Saxon cathedral with a Norman one--the traditions of the late Anglo-Saxon church proved resilient, surviving for some time among the laity and lower clergy.
The issues surrounding episcopacy arise at an interesting time for the two churches.
The "Virginia Report," prepared by the Inter-Anglican Theological and Doctrinal Commission in 1998, "for the first time in history imbues the Archbishops of the Anglican Communion with unheard of pan-Anglican authority and power." Douglas asked the Lutherans what their experience of episcopacy in its many forms across the Lutheran world has to offer Anglicans.
Not having experienced the same degree of ecclesiastical reform as its continental Protestant counterparts, the English religious establishment had retained not only episcopacy but also a liturgy which, in its inception at least, retained the spirit if not the letter of its Roman Catholic model.
Confronting that question honestly will go a long way toward pointing the episcopacy in the direction of needed reforms.
Macaraeg was consecrated bishop on May 24 at the Cathedral of Saint John the Evangelist in Dagupan City, Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas, the principal ordaining prelate, made striking analogies from the fact that the new member of the episcopacy hailed from the town of Malasique, from the Pangasinan word lasi, meaning lightning.
Clarke said that it "has been a busy episcopacy with many challenges of stabilizing finances, leadership, ministry, theological issues and challenges of buildings, whilst continuing to do God's mission and ministry as we see it in our area of God's world."
Steere's chapter on the life of Bishop Joseph Hall offers fresh insights to the intersection of Calvinism and episcopacy, finding Calvinism in an unexpected location, at the court of Charles I.
Robins's evidence for Polk's influence on the religious culture of the South mostly lies in his episcopacy as bishop of Louisiana.
Part of the difficulty any would-be biographer faces with regard to Mignot is how to reconcile his involvement with Modernist questions and prominent Modernists with the orthodoxy requisite to the episcopacy. Even if he were exonerated of the accusation that passages from his writings were targeted in certain propositions of Lamentabili (1903), there remains the matter of his close association with Loisy, extending to approval of the manuscript of L'Evangile et l'eglise--which subsequently came under Vatican censure--and his unwillingness to admit the absolute incompatibility of Loisy's work with orthodoxy.