care

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Related to episodic care: secondary nursing care

CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
This requires the ability not only to identify at-risk patients, but also to monitor their progress and eliminate preventable episodic care and unnecessary emergency room visits.
healthcare systems are moving away from episodic care delivered in silos to coordinated, team-based care that Improves population health.
The historical focus on inpatient and episodic care, incentivized by our fee-for-service system, has caused provider organizations to build up resources in exactly the wrong places.
As part of this transition to integrated healthcare, a new transaction model is emerging alongside traditional FFS, where integrated providers receive lump-sum payments for episodic care.
Business transitions Today Tomorrow * Small business * Part of larger business * Low margins, limited capital * Access to greater capital * Significant "research-to- * Faster adoption of research- practice" gap based methods Service delivery transitions Today Tomorrow * Long delays, limited referral * Open access, reliable referrals * Smaller population, long-term * Larger population, episodic care care * Office based * Office and technology-based * Limited outcome measures * Patient-reported outcome measures * Mental health and SUD treatment * Integrated disease prevention and management Payment transitions Today Tomorrow * Fee-for-service * Bundled, capitated, shared risk * Inflexible, rule-driven * More flexible, innovative, and entrepreneurial
Current payment models are designed to support episodic care.
US health care is in the process of transitioning from a fee-for-service episodic care delivery system to a value-based population health care system with an aligned payment system.
Payers are changing their reimbursement model to focus on care coordination through the use of more episodic care and bundled payments," he said.
A systematic review of interventions to enhance access to best practice primary health care for chronic disease management, prevention and episodic care.
This could lead to problems with prescribing, and doesn't allow doctors to get past episodic care, she says, but adds that the evolution of integrated technologies is permitting coordinated care that is addressing those past mistakes.
By providing acute and episodic care, we offer patients who, without another option, may have to go to the emergency department for non-urgent care," said Lori J.