epistolary


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epistolary

(archaic), epistolatory
(of a novel or other work) constructed in the form of a series of letters
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, the oral residues lurking in these two works are key to understanding each author's designs in writing, respectively, an epistolary novel and a hypertext fiction.
Even a fragment of the Boston Globe's review of Elif Batuman's debut novel would have hooked me: "At once a cutting satire of academia, a fresh take on the epistolary novel, a poignant bildungsroman, and compelling travel literature.
Paul's Large Letters: Paul's Autographic Subscriptions in the Light of Ancient Epistolary Conventions
Examining the popularity of correspondence as facilitated by the regular postal service in England, James How, the author of Epistolary Spaces: English Letter-Writing from the Foundation of the Post Office to Richardson's Clarissa (Ashgate, 2003), pointed out that the verbal as well as emotional transactions occurring through the exchange of personal letters led to the creation of new quasi-imaginative communicative spaces that could be called "epistolary spaces.
It was Samuel Richardson who "invented" the genre we call the epistolary novel, the prose narrative told in letters; and it is his novel Pamela we now designate formally as the first epistolary novel.
It occurred in the Biblioteca Nacional de Madrid one particularly torrid summer while I was conducting research for a book on epistolary and postal poetics and politics.
The first part contains chapters 1, 'Postal Culture after 1861: An Introduction,' and 2, 'Writing and Reading Letters: The Nationalization of the Italian Postal Service, Epistolary Manuals, and the Print Media'.
For about fifteen years Bolognese Franciscan friar Giovanni Battista Martini (1706-1784), well known to music scholars as one of the founders of music historiography, carried on an intense epistolary exchange with Don Girolamo Chiti Carletti (1679-1759), maestro di cappella at San Giovanni in Laterano in Rome, for the primary purpose of sharing information on musicians, theorists, and musical sources dating back to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
The authors employ a wide range of source types, from letters and clothing to portraits and jewels, to analyse diverse political activities such as gift giving, patronage, epistolary networking, reproductive labour, household conduct, and courtly display.
In following this development, Romani identifies letters, epistolary fiction, manuals and correspondence published in newspapers first as vehicles for the circulation of ideas and second as unconventional literary conduits for the formation of a collective, national identity.
Barnes' new book offers a survey of the printed letter from the late sixteenth century to the Restoration, highlighting a variety of the ways authors used the epistolary genre to literary, political, and personal ends.
An epistolary novel written after Austen had apparently already begun to move away from the epistolary form, it is a novella with an unrepentantly "bad" heroine at its core, and seems to sit uneasily among Austen's mature novels, as well as within a narrative of development that sees Austen steadily "outgrow" the epistolary mode.