epithalamium

(redirected from epithalamia)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

epithalamium

(ĕp'ĭthəlā`mēəm), song or poem written to celebrate a marriage. An elaborate form of pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
..... Click the link for more information.
, the epithalamium usually tells of the happenings of the wedding day. Nymphs, shepherds, and appropriate mythological figures are present to share the poet's joy. Epithalamiums were written in ancient times by Pindar, Sappho, and Catullus. The biblical Song of Solomon is a classic of the genre as is Edmund Spenser's "Epithalamium" (1595), written to celebrate his own marriage.

epithalamium

poem in honor of bride and groom. [Western Lit.: LLEI, 1: 283]
References in periodicals archive ?
Humanists usually include prayers to God at the end of their epithalamia and often refer to the sacrament of marriage.
Since epithalamia are panegyrics, orators chose classical and contemporary examples that would be flattering to specific living rulers, brides, grooms, and families, who were usually present in the audience.
His condemnation of nuptial oratory is based on one or two epithalamia by Francesco Filelfo.
This list does not include anonymous orators and humanists whose epithalamia are cited only once in this article.
The practice was more popular in Siena, as Agostino Dati's fourteen extant epithalamia in Latin and Italian attest.
Ludovico Carbone, an orator at the Este court in Ferrara, for example, refers in epithalamia to members of the audience and sometimes to brides and grooms as his former students.
Some epithalamia by Carbone, Collenuccio, and Marliani fill thirty manuscript folios.
On the popularity of epithalamia and works on marriage, see Palazolis, fol.
For verse epithalamia in Greece and Rome, see Keydell.
Epithalamia at courtly weddings became popular just after these Greek rhetorical works were available in the mid-fifteenth century.
Forster, 98, 106-15, argues that epithalamia became increasingly erotic in the sixteenth century.