epithalamium

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epithalamium

(ĕp'ĭthəlā`mēəm), song or poem written to celebrate a marriage. An elaborate form of pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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, the epithalamium usually tells of the happenings of the wedding day. Nymphs, shepherds, and appropriate mythological figures are present to share the poet's joy. Epithalamiums were written in ancient times by Pindar, Sappho, and Catullus. The biblical Song of Solomon is a classic of the genre as is Edmund Spenser's "Epithalamium" (1595), written to celebrate his own marriage.

epithalamium

poem in honor of bride and groom. [Western Lit.: LLEI, 1: 283]
References in periodicals archive ?
1612) EPITHALAMIA or Nuptiall Poems upon the Most Blessed and Happie Marriage between .
12) Which epithalamia would have been available to Claudian when he wrote De raptu?
Although few English poets before Spenser wrote epithalamia, a distinguished number of seventeenth-century poets published these marriage hymns, including Crashaw, Donne, Dryden, Herrick, Jonson, and Marvell, whose works appear in Fielding's library.
27) The epithalamia of Sidonius, Dracontius, and Ennodius have the lovers 'brought together by Cupid and Venus, who waltz through the air in dove-drawn chariots pursued by flocks of Nymphs and Amoretti' (Cameron, pp.
In Catullus's epithalamia 61 and 62, marriage surfaces as a necessary condition for the fulfillment of the gender roles of a young man and woman; within the framework of marriage, Roman men and women are able to embody the values of amor, tides, and pietas, the culmination of which is to provide legitimate citizens for Rome (61.
38) Extant marriage contracts are brief and formulaic and, unlike humanist epithalamia, do not follow the rhetorical dictates of classical oratory.
In addition to hesitant brides, Herrick's epithalamia are also
Apart from drawing relations between both texts, Czapla lucidly identifies the references to epithalamia and other genres of classical antiquity and discusses the function of those references.
With the exception of the epithalamia and a few other texts, praise of love was restricted to the love elegy, where, however, the poet dealt with his love for his mistress, not for his wife.
28] Moreover, Catullus 64, as one of the exemplary epithalamia Antiquity wills to the Renaissance, proves to be especially consonant with the thematic contents of "Sur des vers de Virgile," a text concerned for major stretches with the sexual, moral, and social aspects of marriage.
9) Dubrow stops short, however, of assessing the ideological significance of this distinctive feature of Herrick's epithalamia.
Besides the chapter on drama, the longest treats epithalamia (100), but most of the others deal with praise genres.