epithalamium

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epithalamium

(ĕp'ĭthəlā`mēəm), song or poem written to celebrate a marriage. An elaborate form of pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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, the epithalamium usually tells of the happenings of the wedding day. Nymphs, shepherds, and appropriate mythological figures are present to share the poet's joy. Epithalamiums were written in ancient times by Pindar, Sappho, and Catullus. The biblical Song of Solomon is a classic of the genre as is Edmund Spenser's "Epithalamium" (1595), written to celebrate his own marriage.

epithalamium

poem in honor of bride and groom. [Western Lit.: LLEI, 1: 283]
References in periodicals archive ?
Amoretti 1 expresses one of the conflicts that will occupy both this sonnet sequence and the Epithalamion that ostensibly resolves it: that between human tendencies to both idealization and domination.
Amoretti and Epithalamion were first published in November, 1594, as 'written not long since'.
Short Time's Endless Monument: The Symbolism of Numbers in Edmund Spenser's Epithalamion.
The lack of rhythmic variety at the end of stanzas seems one contributing factor: especially in "June," stanzas end with cadences so similar that they begin to sound something like the end-refrain from the "November" elegy or the Epithalamion.
Written in the voice of a European conqueror, and with just enough metrical attention to evoke the blank verse form of the empire, McMorris's "Fragments: Journal of a Voyage to Undiscovered Lands" portrays the New World as a place that is no less contrived than the airy stage of the epithalamion.
Adapting the concept of "demesne," or domain, from Paul Alpers's work on the lyric, Montrose shows how Spenser, in the years between the 1590 and 1596 publications of The Faerie Queene, fashioned a poetic domain of increasing public authority, directing the encomiastic energies he had expended on the epic to the smaller lyric and narrative forms of Colin Clouts Come Home Again, Amoretti, and Epithalamion.
The great coronation banquet is held on Christmas Day, and after Mass a thousand knights serve bread, a thousand of them serve wine, all of them dressed in white, and we have a distinct sense that the ending of the poem is itself an epithalamion.
JULIE CARR is the author of Mead: An Epithalamion (Georgia) and
True, many have sensed her in the moonlight of A Midsummer Night's Dream, say, or the Cynthia who spies on Spenser in Epithalamion.
Miriam Allott cites Spenser's Epithalamion ("Her paps lyke lillies budded" 176) as a source for the disputed passage, and a traditional reading of the Valentine discovers a venerable literary convention in the comparison of Mary's breasts with "twin water-lilies" (33).
Spenser's marriage hymn, The Epithalamion, Short Time's
Carol Kaske's comparison of Edmund Spenser's Amoretti and Epithalamion with the book of Psalms is a model in this respect.