epitoke

epitoke

[′ep·ə‚tōk]
(invertebrate zoology)
The posterior portion of marine polychaetes; contains the gonads.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
NR X X Metatrochophore larvae Family Sabellidae X X X Parasabella jamaicensis X X X Juvenile Family Spionidae X X X Metatrochophore larvae Family Syllidae X X X Subfamily Autolytinae NR X X Adult epitoke, male polybranchius Subfamily Eusyllinae X X X Odontosyllis sp.
Diglycidylether of Bisphenol A (DGEBA), Epitoke Resin 828 from Hexion Specialty Chemicals (epoxy equivalent = 187 g/eq) was used after drying under vacuum during 4 h at 80[degrees]C; 4-toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI), 10-undecenoyl chloride, and 4-pentenoyl chloride from Aldrich were distilled before using.
One specimen from the rocky intertidal of Limon was a female epitoke. Notopodial falcigers are absent and paragnaths are fewer than in nonepitokous specimens, I = 1, II = 21-22, III = 21, IV = 28, V = 0, VI = 5-6, VII & VII = 5.
In this work we describe an estuarine species of nereidid that bores in calcareous sedimentary rocks in shallow water in Chetumal Bay; two epitoke specimens were collected and are also described herein.
(epitoke stages and eggs) Phylum Arthropoda Class Crustacea Homarus americanus (advanced larval stages) Ovalipes ocellatus (zoea, megalops stages) Procellanid zoea Calanoid copepods Euphausids, spp.
A larva of Armandia brevis (Moore, 1906) was reared from an embryo in water containing spawning epitokes, attracted to the FHL dock with a submerged light.
During a palolo swarm, only the gonads are present, the reproductive organs, called epitokes, break off the main body of the worm, which stays in its coral home.
when great funnels of worms burst to the surface and spread out until the whole area is a wriggling mass of green and brown." People go out into the ocean to collect the epitokes, which are the yolky egg-filled posterior ends shed by the spawning females.
As the day wanes, the epitokes accumulate in enormous, tangled masses near the shores of the Melanesian islands.
Palolo generally emerge once a year to release their reproductive segments (epitokes) into nearshore waters (Caspers, 1984; Itano and Buckley, 1988).