equation of motion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

equation of motion

[i′kwā·zhən əv ′mō·shən]
(fluid mechanics)
One of a set of hydrodynamical equations representing the application of Newton's second law of motion to a fluid system; the total acceleration on an individual fluid particle is equated to the sum of the forces acting on the particle within the fluid.
(mechanics)
Equation which specifies the coordinates of particles as functions of time.
A differential equation, or one of several such equations, from which the coordinates of particles as functions of time can be obtained if the initial positions and velocities of the particles are known.
(quantum mechanics)
A differential equation which enables one to predict the statistical distribution of the results of any measurement upon a system at any time if the initial dynamical state of the system is known.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fractional Hamiltonian equation of motion can be determined as follow
In this case, the runaway and causal problems are eliminated and the exact equation of motion of a charged particle was recently given by Rohlrich [34] and Yaghjian [35].
The equation of motion has been solved using the commercial finite element code ABAQUS (2006).
A better estimate could be obtained from the full equation of motion for the yarn, but no simple analytic expression can be obtained in this case.
which is the equation of motion of a non-linear damped and forced oscillator immersed in a viscous medium.
0] is a length scale to be identified as the location of the first turning point of x(t) motion, the equation of motion between each turning point can be written as
Equation (2) is the equation of motion for human capital.
Such a system will have an equation of motion of the form x[double prime](t) + x(t) = 0, where x(t) is the displacement of the particle from its equilibrium position.
The ease with which Ott and Sommerer found their example and the fact that there is nothing particularly special about the chosen equation of motion suggest that riddled systems may be relatively common - albeit not as ubiquitous as chaotic systems.