equatorial radius

equatorial radius

[‚e·kwə′tȯr·ē·əl ′rād·ē·əs]
(geodesy)
The radius assigned to the great circle making up the terrestrial equator; approximately 6,378,139 meters (20,925,653 feet).
References in periodicals archive ?
2] is the radius of the umbra (which term applies to both total and annular eclipses) at a height Z above the fundamental plane, and n is the speed of the shadow (my emphasis), both reckoned in units of the Earth's equatorial radius.
Multiplication by 6378, being the equatorial radius of the Earth in km, followed (if hourly variations are used for the derivatives) by division by 3600, the number of seconds in one hour, gives the result in km per second.
The equatorial radius (r) for the bodies is divided by the Schwarzschild's radius ([r.
The centre of the lunar umbra in the fundamental plane has the coordinates (x,y) in units of the equatorial radius of the Earth.
2] = 1, where p is the geocentric distance of the poles in units of the equatorial radius of the Earth.