equatorial telescope


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Related to equatorial telescope: declination axis, Equatorial mount

equatorial telescope

[‚e·kwə′tȯr·ē·əl ′tel·ə‚skōp]
(engineering)
An astronomical telescope that revolves about an axis parallel to the earth's axis and automatically keeps a star on which it has been fixed in its field of view.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Software Bisque, the world's foremost manufacturer of equatorial telescope mounts for remote/robotic astronomy, has announced its first foray into building altazimuth mounts (and modifying its storied TheSkyX software to control them).
They came into wide use only with the invention of equatorial telescope mounts to track the sky's motion.
When film ruled the world of astrophotography, to be considered premium, an equatorial telescope mount only had to be solid with a smooth-running drive and slow-motion controls, because the long exposures that film required always had to be guided.
The USNO's 26-inch Great Equatorial Telescope, the world's largest refractor for more than a decade, saw first light on November 20,1873.
The south celestial pole and its attendant Polaris Australis are primarily targets for people aligning their equatorial telescope mounts.
The first time I participated, in 1977, I arrived on the mountain with a truck carrying my homebuilt 155-millimeter (6.1-inch) equatorial telescope weighing some 150 kilograms (330 pounds).
Williams discovered more than 50 new variables on photographic plates that he took with a 4.4-inch portrait lens piggybacked on his hand-driven equatorial telescope. These discoveries included Cepheids, eclipsing variables, and Mira-type stars.
When set up as an equatorial telescope for photography, the LX200's tracking system proved very accurate.
I put Harrington's entry for Jupiter Telescopes on page 75 to trial by comparing it with the S&T Test Report of the Juno 12.5 Equatorial Telescope in the August 1994 issue, page 49.
There is no mention of how to reduce vibration, the bugbear that ruins most solar eclipse shots, nor anything about drive rates for taking long-exposure lunar eclipse shots with an equatorial telescope. Where are the suggestions for sequences of exposures during a total solar eclipse, for planning various equipment setups, and for shooting from the deck of a ship or through the window of an airplane?