equilibrium orbit

equilibrium orbit

[‚ē·kwə′lib·rē·əm ‚ȯr·bət]
(nucleonics)
A path, such as a circular path in a synchrotron, or a point moving through space, such as in a linear accelerator, about which the particles in a particle accelerator oscillate, experiencing an effective restoring force toward the path or point. Also known as stable orbit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recall that QCM in the Schwarzschild metric predicts a specific but limited set of radii for circular equilibrium orbits that have both inward and outward forces acting, in direct contrast to Newtonian orbital dynamics which has an equilibrium orbit at all planetary orbital radii.
The QCM theory [6] dictates that not all planetary orbits about the central star are available as equilibrium orbits but, instead, QCM determined equilibrium orbits exist only at specific radii.
Of course, one assumes that the body in consideration has been in an equilibrium orbit for at least tens of millions of years.
I assume that each S-star is in a QCM equilibrium orbit in order to use the Newtonian values for the plot of L' = L/uc versus m in Figure 1.
The north-south asymmetry will disappear and the vertical motions of stars in the solar neighbourhood will revert back to their equilibrium orbits unless we get hit again.

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