equine

(redirected from equines)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

equine

of, relating to, or belonging to the family Equidae, which comprises horses, zebras, and asses
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

equine

[′ē‚kwīn]
(vertebrate zoology)
Resembling a horse.
Of or related to the Equidae.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equine influenza (EI) is one of the leading respiratory infections of equines caused by orthomyxo viruses of the genus influenza A virus.
The main objective of the society was to prevent equines from harsh treatment, he said and added that at present, employees of SPCA were performing duties in different parts of the province.
In equines, large strongyles (red worms or blood worms), small strongyles (small worms), Parascaris equorum (ascarids), Strongyloides westeri, Habronema spp., Draschia spp., Oxyurides (pinworms), Dictyocaluc arnfieldi (lung worms) and Trichostrongylus axei (stomach worms) are responsible for nematodiasis.
"The priority should be on protecting the welfare of Wales' equines and supporting the industry."
Horses are probably "dead-end" or incidental hosts in the WNV transmission cycle; 10%-20% of the infections result in clinical disease, and the mortality rate in equines varies from 28% to 45% (9).
Akzo Nobel (Arnhem, Netherlands) has patented an equine infectious anemia (EIA) vaccine that provides immunity to mammals, especially equines, from infection with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and which allows differentiation between vaccinated and non-vaccinated, but exposed, mammals or equines.
Thompson first became interested in the syndrome in 1987, when ancient equines when her 8-year-old horse developed the debilitating disease.
(a) The propensity of equines to behave in ways that may result in injury, harm, or death to persons on or around them.
During epidemics and epizootics, VEE virus is transmitted rapidly among equines and from equines to humans by a variety of mosquito species.
A total of 3456 faecal samples of equines brought to the mobile clinic of the department of clinical medicine and surgery, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, screened for gastrointestinal tract (GIT) parasitism using standard protocols.