equinoctial tide

equinoctial tide

[‚ē·kwə′näk·shəl ′tīd]
(oceanography)
A tide occurring near an equinox.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the three-meter easement is not exactly specified in the implementing rules and regulations of the Water Code of the Philippines of 1979, the law states: 'All easements of public use prescribed for the banks or rivers and the shores of seas and lakes shall be reckoned from the line reached by the highest flood which does not cause inundation or the highest equinoctial tide, whichever is higher.
directus were carried out taking advantage of 2011 equinoctial tides. The specimens were obtained from the intertidal and shallow subtidal sandy areas at low tide (Fig.
Lawrence occur at mid-year and at year end, contradicting the age-old notion that equinoctial tides (March and September) will be the larger tides.
One of these characteristics concerns the stronger equinoctial tides. Plinys oft quoted statement probably accounts for the assumption by most oceanographers that the so-called equinoctial tides (March and September) reach higher levels than tides close to the solstices (June and December).
The definition of tide type #1 implies that equinoctial tides are in a way special, but this rule is in no way universal.