talipes equinovarus

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talipes equinovarus

[¦tal·ə‚pēz ‚ek·wi·no′va·rəs]
(medicine)
The most common form of clubfoot, characterized by an extreme turning down and under of the foot, it is seen more often in boys and tends to affect one foot only.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic epidemiology study of idiopathic talipes equinovarus.
Down syndrome 1 236 Talipes equinovarus 1 087 Cleft lip and/or palate 943 NTDs 787 Albinism 344 Multiple priority CDs 290 FAS 73 Note: Table made from bar graph.
We also suggest that AP displacement and the PM could be useful parameters to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments for spastic equinovarus, particularly surgical interventions [17].
This can result in permanent loss of the protective sensibility of the sole and, through loss of motor function, to equinovarus impairment.
8] There is a paucity of morphometric data of the human tali in South Indian population, and this study will be helpful to surgeons for surgical interventions during the treatment of talar neck fractures caused by trauma, in designing talar body prostheses, and in aligning the bones in the treatment of congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) or club foot.
Methodic indications: in order to prevent the typical flexion stiffness and the external rotation of the hip, knee flexion and equinovarus, we install the patient so as to have the basin flat on the bed, with no flexion of the hip and knee, the lower limb totally coupled so as to avoid its fall in external rotation, the feet is maintained at 90[degrees] on the lower leg.
Campomelic dysplasia (CD, OMIM #114290) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized with bending and shortness in the long bones of the lower extremities, typical facial features, hypoplastic scapula, costa defect, narrow thorax and pes equinovarus.
Deformity and displacement of the hip are, after the equinovarus foot deformity, the second most common orthopaedic problem in children with cerebral palsy presenting an increase in the severity and incidence of hip pathology with the severity of the palsy (Murray and Robb 2006).
Former winners have undertaken a wide range of projects including those relating to wound management, Lymphatic Filariasis and Talipes Equinovarus.
The use of the analytic hierarchy process to aid decision making in acquired equinovarus deformity.
3) Spine and foot anomalies, such as equinovarus and equinovalgus deformities, have been described but occur less frequently.