talipes equinovarus

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Related to equinovarus: arthrogryposis, talipes equinovarus, equinovalgus, talipes varus, CTEV

talipes equinovarus

[¦tal·ə‚pēz ‚ek·wi·no′va·rəs]
(medicine)
The most common form of clubfoot, characterized by an extreme turning down and under of the foot, it is seen more often in boys and tends to affect one foot only.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a case report of a 1-month-old infant with bilateral tibial hemimelia (probably Weber type VIIa (1)) and equinovarus deformities, the limb with a small tibial anlage was treated with knee disarticulation, and the limb with a larger tibial anlage was treated with forefoot amputation and fusion of the os calcis to the fibula, performed with future plans of fusing the fibula to the anlage.
Clubfoot deformity, or talipes equinovarus, can be associated with tibial hemimelia, including hypoplastic tibia, Weber type I (Fig.
Genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of talipes equinovarus.
Segregation analysis of idiopathic talipes equinovarus in a Texan population.
Pedigree analysis and epidemiological features of idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus in the United Kingdom: A case control study.
Congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot): An overview of the aetiology and treatment.
Prospective study of equinovarus foot in 20,000 live newborn infants.
Genetics and epidemiology of idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus.
Minimum incidence of congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) and past treatment evaluation of residual deformities in a population in Zimbabwe.
She had very small nostrils, hearing aids in both ears, a short webbed neck with no mobility of head on neck, pectus excavatum deformity of the thoracic cage, severe kyphoscoliosis, ulnar deviation of the wrist and severe talipes equinovarus.
An equinovarus deformity is often present and compromises heel strike when the person is walking [4].
Non-velocity-related effects of a rigid double-stopped ankle-foot orthosis on gait and lower limb muscle activity of hemiparetic subjects with an equinovarus deformity.