equipment ground


Also found in: Acronyms.

equipment ground

1. In electric wiring, a connection from the exposed metal parts of equipment housings to provide a path to ground in the event such parts become energized as a result of failure of the insulation of a conductor housed within the equipment; a ground connection to any noncurrent-carrying metal parts of a wiring installation or equipment, or both.
2. A ground connector to (a) noncurrent-carrying metal parts of electrical equipment or (b) the metallic shields of a wiring installation, or both.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's unsafe to use adapters that convert three-prong plugs to two-prong ones, because as normally used, the adapters bypass the safety features of the equipment ground.
If you didn't have an equipment ground wire, attach a sticker to the cover plate saying "No Equipment Ground." This sticker is included with most GFCI receptacles.
The equipment ground attaches to that third, round prong on a three-prong plug.
The rule requiring the equipment ground came into code about 1960, so many older homes lack equipment ground wiring and three-slot receptacles.
A GFCI (ground-fault circuit-interrupter) delivers even better shock protection than the equipment ground. And it operates dependably without the equipment ground.
Simply plug the tester into the receptacle and the combination of lights indicates whether the equipment ground is working.
Exception: Some homes have two-wire systems and an equipment ground that consists of metal electrical boxes connected by metallic tubes (called conduit) or metallic sheathed cable (called BX) rather than a separate copper ground wire.
The equipment ground attaches to the exposed metal parts of lamps, power saws, electrical boxes and other devices--all those metal surfaces that can carry electricity--and runs all the way back to the main electrical panel and then into the earth.
The big problem with widely separated equipment grounded at their respective locations is the IR drops that result from currents through the lossy earth.

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