equipment

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equipment

[ə′kwip·mənt]
(engineering)
One or more assemblies capable of performing a complete function.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hardware

Machinery and equipment (CPUs, drives, keyboards, printers, scanners, cables, etc.). In operation, a computer is both hardware and software, and one is useless without the other. The hardware design specifies the command format it can follow, and the software instructions in that format tell it what to do. See instruction set and computer.

Hardware Is "Speed, Storage and Transmission"
The more memory (RAM) and storage (hard and solid state disks) a computer has, the more work it can do. The faster memory and disks transfer data and instructions to the CPU and the faster instructions are executed, the more work gets done in a given time frame. A hardware requirement is based on the quantity of data processed and the number of users or applications being served simultaneously. How much? How fast?

Software Is "Logic and Language"
Software deals with the details of an ever-changing business and must process transactions in a logical fashion. Languages are used to program the software. The "logic and language" involved in systems analysis and software programming is an order of magnitude more complicated than specifying a hardware storage and transmission requirement. See software, information system and wares.


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References in classic literature ?
It might be palace without, but it was wigwam within; so that, between the stateliness of his mansion and the squalidness of his furniture, the gallant White Plume presented some such whimsical incongruity as we see in the gala equipments of an Indian chief on a treaty-making embassy at Washington, who has been generously decked out in cocked hat and military coat, in contrast to his breech-clout and leathern legging; being grand officer at top, and ragged Indian at bottom.
Presently a horseman with jangling equipment drew rein be- fore the colonel of the regiment.
He began, at an early age, as a clerk, and served an apprenticeship of seven years, for which he received one hundred pounds sterling, was maintained at the expense of the company, and furnished with suitable clothing and equipments. His probation was generally passed at the interior trading posts; removed for years from civilized society, leading a life almost as wild and precarious as the savages around him; exposed to the severities of a northern winter, often suffering from a scarcity of food, and sometimes destitute for a long time of both bread and salt.