equivalent sets

equivalent sets

[i¦kwiv·ə·lənt ′sets]
(mathematics)
Sets which have the same cardinal number; sets whose elements can be put into one-to-one correspondence with each other. Also known as equinumerable sets; equipotent sets.
References in periodicals archive ?
where X, Y, Z are equivalent sets. Their permutations do not change the result of their Cartesian product.
Dataset could be divided into several equivalent sets according to K-anonymity, and each set contains at least K and no more than 2K records.
In unifying phase, we check all equivalent sets in the dataset at first and then check each tuple in the equivalent set.
The clustering K-anonymity would assign similar records to the same equivalent set, while the similarity among these records makes it harder to discriminate different identities than before.
(3) Link {[QI.sub.1], [QI.sub.2], ..., [QI.sub.n], SD} and |ID, [QI.sub.1], [QI.sub.2], ..., [QI.sub.n]} to find the equivalent set ES which contains the ID of objective.
In our work, we try to adjust the division of records, making it hard to discriminate the identity within each equivalent set, thus preserving privacy.
In this paper, for preserving users' privacy, we expect the records in the same equivalent set to be as similar as possible.
At first, we cluster the records in private table which need to be published, and assign similar records to the same equivalent set. Then, we unify the quasi-identifiers in the same clusters by generalizing and suppressing operations.
The goal of this method is to preserve privacy, so a lower discriminating rate within one equivalent set suggests a higher security performance.
Because Asus ships over 11 million notebook and netbook PCs worldwide a year and is even expected to achieve shipment of 15 million units in 2010, Trend Micro will have to supply equivalent sets of software in the future.
In the first experiment, equivalent sets of artifacts were placed in a tract with optimal visibility (100%, i.e., with the ground surface not obscured), in another with poor visibility (20%), and in two others with average visibility (50%-70%).
For example, a few days prior to the lesson, Kathleen had asked the children to choose any number between 10 and 30 and find as many ways as possible to partition that number into equivalent sets. In the whole group discussion, she began with, "As I went around I noticed many of you chose 20 and 30.

Full browser ?