equivalent temperature


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equivalent temperature

[i′kwiv·ə·lənt ′tem·prə·chər]
(meteorology)
The temperature that an air parcel would have if all water vapor were condensed out at constant pressure, the latent heat released being used to heat the air. Also known as isobaric equivalent temperature.
The temperature that an air parcel would have after undergoing the following theoretical process: dry-adiabatic expansion until saturated, pseudoadiabatic expansion until all moisture is precipitated out, and dry adiabatic compression to the initial pressure; this is the equivalent temperature as read from a thermodynamic chart and is always greater than the isobaric equivalent temperature. Also known as adiabatic equivalent temperature; pseudoequivalent temperature.
(thermodynamics)
A term used in British engineering for that temperature of a uniform enclosure in which, in still air, a sizable blackbody at 75°F (23.9°C) would lose heat at the same rate as in the environment.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

equivalent temperature

An index similar to effective temperature, but not considering the effects of humidity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

equivalent temperature

The degree of comfort in the passenger cabin in terms of temperature effectiveness. It takes into account factors like cabin heat load, humidity, thermal inertia, and temperature distribution throughout the aircraft. The term is used in aircraft environmental system design.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
3.1 Equivalent temperature. For the evaluation of thermal comfort, the investigation of single thermal parameters is insufficient.
Assuming the linear expansion coefficient of concrete, a, to be 1.0 x [10.sup.-5]/[degrees]C, the equivalent temperature of differential shrinkage between the pile cap and abutment backwall concrete, Ts, can be determined using the following formula:
Furthermore, physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) is utilized as an indicator to evaluate and explore at different seasons the impacts of the meteorological parameters on the thermal comfort conditions representing different climate regions of Algeria: coastal, inland, and Saharan zones.
The UTCI is an equivalent temperature of an actual complex microclimate thermal condition incorporating temperature, humidity, wind speed, and solar and thermal radiation.
4.2 Equivalent Temperature. In order to assess the equivalent temperatures, high resolution infrared images of the driver-TPD were recorded at stable thermal conditions.
In addition, several indices, including operative temperature ([T.sub.o]), equivalent temperature ([T.sub.eq]), Oxford index (wet-dry index--WD), discomfort index (DI), fighter index of thermal stress (FITS), modified discomfort index (MDI), environmental stress index (ESI), wet-bulb dry temperature (WBDT), and relative humidity dry temperature (RHDT), were also estimated based on the published literature [13,23-29,37].
[2.] ISO 14505-2:2006(E), Ergonomics of the thermal environment--Evaluation of thermal environments in vehicles--Part 2: Determination of equivalent temperature, International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, 2006.
where Ey indicates the predicted mortality in area y; ln([pop.sub.y]) is an offset term for the population size in area y; f(t) indicates the smoothed time trend; [[gamma].sub.i] represents model coefficients for the i covariates [x.sub.i] (day of the week, age, density, education, and SES); [[alpha].sub.j] indicates the coefficients for the j covariates [w.sub.j] ([PM.sub.10] and [O.sub.3]); [[lambda].sub.k] represents model coefficients for the k distance to coast indicator variables (k = 1, 2); and [beta]1, [beta]2, and [beta]3 represent model coefficients for NDVI and UTCI; [delta] indicates the breakpoint equivalent temperature, in our case the 95th and 99th UTCI percentile.
Applications of a universal thermal index: physiological equivalent temperature. International Journal of Biometeorology, 43(2): 76-84.
This study focuses on predicting the early-age deformation of JPCP due to environmental loads using the simplified equivalent temperature difference ([DELTA][T.sub.teltd]) concept with Finite Element (FE) based primary response model, namely ISLAB 2000.
With a 50 per cent humidity factor, the equivalent temperature can exceed 190 degrees Fahrenheit.

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