erect

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erect

1. (of an optical image) having the same orientation as the object; not inverted
2. Physiol (of the penis, clitoris, or nipples) firm or rigid after swelling with blood, esp as a result of sexual excitement
3. (of plant parts) growing vertically or at right angles to the parts from which they arise
References in classic literature ?
She had Roman features and a double chin, disappearing into a throat like a pillar: these features appeared to me not only inflated and darkened, but even furrowed with pride; and the chin was sustained by the same principle, in a position of almost preternatural erectness.
Trichome erectness on soybean leaves has been shown to influence the abundance of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Trialeurodes abutiloneus Haldeman (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) (Lambert et al.
Si is also found to enhance water stress tolerance in plants by retaining leaf water potential, leaves erectness, stomatal conductance, structure of xylem vessels under high transpiration rates, and photosynthetic activity (Gong et al.
The beast-man distinguishes himself from the she-wolf; his fall into a condition even "worse than the wolves" involves "mocking" the she-wolf for her "four feet" and "straightening" himself into bipedal erectness.
In rice silicon helps to maintain leaf erectness increase photosynthesis through improved light interception and results in greater resistance to diseases and insect pests.
In the human soul personal erectness has become a fact.
The authors reasoned that, based on crop models, the root architecture in general and the root angle in particular likely had a more profound impact on the maize yield increases over the past decades than aboveground indicators, such as leaf erectness.
An important function of cell wall silica in Equisetum is in maintenance of shoot erectness (Kaufman et al.
The erotic overtones of the rose, which are conveyed by allusions to its resemblance to feminine flesh, and by its phallic erectness and even haughty aloofness (carried by the plurivalence of the adjective "farouche" (8) which is also linked to the "blood" running through the rose's petals), differ dramatically from conventions of the language-of-flowers tradition.