eremite


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eremite

a Christian hermit or recluse
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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He felt the fullness of satiety: Then loathed he in his native land to dwell, Which seem'd to him more lone than Eremite's sad cell.
Tiny eremite at play in the grass where God is proclaiming the present.
minus, Dorcabune anthracotherioides, Eotragus sp., Miotragocerus gluten, Kubanotragus sakolovi, Sivoreas eremite, Gazella sp., Giraffokeryx punjabiensis, Giraffa priscilla (Matthew, 1929; Colbert, 1933, 1935; Pilgrim, 1937, 1939; Raza, 1983; Akhtar 1992; Barry et al., 2002; Badgley et al., 2008; Khan et al., 2008, 2009, 2010).
His room seemed an eremite's cave of meditation filled with icons, his walls lit by flames of the spiritual.
"Lucent" links up to Keats's portrayal of fanaticism as heat (e.g., "ancient fervour'), but also to his invocations of the religious as a viable desideratum for modern subjectivity: for instance, the Ode's final anticipation of "warm love," or, in the sonnet "Bright Star," the "steadfast" celestial body that watches "like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite / The moving waters at their priestlike task" (4-5).
ACROSS: 1 Rased; 4 Pig; 6 Poteen; 9 Computer operator; 11 Valentine; 12 Eremite; 13 Rattler; 14 Rusticate; 15 Postcode; 17 Plantain; 21 Partially; 24 Notated; 27 Anybody; 28 Toadstool; 29 All in the same boat; 30 Cyrene; 31 Hid; 32 Ahead.
Petrarch-Actaeon, the anchorite or eremite of love: One day hunting, as I used to do, l went, and that beast, beautiful and savage, in a fountain naked stood, at the time when the sun was burning strongest.
Half-sister to G2 winner The Lone Ranger (by Shelter Half), Listed winners Green Book (by Golden Act) and Eremite (by Spring Double), and G1-placed Dancing Pretense (by Dancing Count).
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores.
Here, the sonnet effectively consolidates a range of well-established Romantic motifs, all of which reinforce the ideal of quiet work: 'the secret ministry of frost' in Coleridge's 'Frost at Midnight', the 'silent tasks' in Wordsworth's 'Gypsies', and the 'patient, sleepless eremite' in Keats's 'Bright star' sonnet.
would I were stedfast as thou art-- Not in lone splendor hung aloft the night, And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like Nature's patient, sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priest like task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Or gazing on the new soft-fallen masque Of snow upon the mountains and the moors.
According to Harpham, the eremite isolates himself or herself in the desert and rejects human society.