eremite

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eremite

a Christian hermit or recluse
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Neither poet named as a source for Tao was especially eremitic, nor do the entries on other poets known for rejecting society hint at such a line of transmission.
They own a computer that they use to produce a newsletter for people living the eremitic life.
Paul Fredette said that he and his wife, Karen, are surprised by the variety of life circumstances they see in the readership of Raven's Bread, their quarterly newsletter for people living the eremitic life.
27) At least since the De doctrina christiana, where not even illiterate eremitic ascetics are permitted a culturally unmediated understanding of Scripture, since all of them heard it read in a particular language which they had to learn at some point (De doctrina christiana, Preface (5), and since even the signs divinely given in the Bible are of the "conventional" type and were presented through human beings (De doctrina christiana 2.
In terms of the ideal of eremitic withdrawal Wang Mian displayed, this one speech, far from leaving "most readers confused," clearly shows that Guo, too, was for making a name "to be handed down in history," the fundamental reason for his "ascetic" filial piety.
McNamara believed a renewal of the eremitic Carmelite tradition required a desert or wilderness.
Peter Damian was a man possessed of a dream about the eremitic Church.
To mid-Tang writers, the vicissitudes of grand urban gardens reflected the delusions of those who rejoiced in worldly power, yet rural retreats embodied an eremitic stance they simply could not embrace.
Religious brothers have been given the short end of the stick almost since the first monks (a term derived from Syriac-speaking monks and, loosely translated, meaning "the single ones") began to separate themselves from society, either singly (the eremitic form) or in community (the cenobitic form).
Patterns of Disengagement picks up where Aat Vervoom's earlier study, Men of the Cliffs and Caves: The Development of the Chinese Eremitic Tradition to the End of the Han Dynasty (Hong Kong: Chinese Univ.
These include the imitation of Christ ihidhaya, "the Only-Begotten One," in a sinful world; the fulfillment of the motives for singleness through seclusion, not in rejection of the world but to achieve unity with God; and finally the fulfillment of the eremitic vocation in becoming a true Christian.
Still, while China certainly has had its hermits, and while there is a considerable amount of poetry portraying the eremitic life, these are profoundly misleading terms when applied to the general phenomenon of reclusion in China, especially so when applied to occasional withdrawal.