erosion surface

erosion surface

[ə′rō·zhən ‚sər·fəs]
(geology)
A land surface shaped by agents of erosion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Erosion surfaces must be considered when superimposing the thickness of the overlying layer--if the overlying layer is faulted, the same displacement must be reflected in the erosion surface (Fig.
Such layers are constructed volumetrically by filling the empty space between the underlying layer and the erosion surface (Fig.
The Devonian erosion surface was constructed by superimposing the thickness of the D2rz-pr and D1km layers where applicable topography was obtained by subtracting the thickness from the topography of the Parnu surface.
Where applicable, the layer extents were constructed in the wedge in the Devonian erosion surface.
This procedure allowed the creation of digital models for Neogene sediment and erosion surface (buried under Neogene sediments) capacity allocation.
According to the classic geomorphological models for the central Iberian Chain, they were attributed to either a single extensive erosion surface (Fundamental Erosion Surface of the Iberian Chain, FES, Pena et al.
However, the erosion surface developed northwards and eastwards, at altitudes usually ranging from 1450 to 1500 m.
The erosion surface has no local age constraint, since correlative lacustrine deposits have not been found within the Maestrat sector.
The erosion surfaces constitute extremely useful markers because they postdate previous events, and then are displaced by later ones (Fig.
In the Slave Province, orogenesis had ceased by 2580 Ma (massive late granite event) and the erosion surface cooled to ca.
The fact that it had an erosion surface means it was exposed to the atmosphere and to weathering," says Buick.