Error of Measurement


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Error of Measurement

 

the deviation of a measurement result from the true value of the quantity being measured. A distinction is made between systematic errors, random errors, and blunders (also called gross errors, or mistakes).

Systematic errors result chiefly from measuring-device errors and the imperfection of measurement techniques. Random errors are due to a number of uncontrolled circumstances, for example, small variations in the conditions of measurement. The causes of blunders include disrepair of measuring devices, misreading of instruments, and drastic changes in the conditions of measurement. Blunders are usually disregarded when results are processed. The effect of systematic errors can be reduced by introducing corrections or by multiplying the instrument readings by correction factors. Estimates of random errors are obtained by the methods of mathematical statistics.

References in periodicals archive ?
Standard error of measurement (SEM) helps to quantify the errors in intelligence tests in order to facilitate the most accurate interpretation and presentation of scores.
To numerically express the accuracy of measurement (reliability) of the used device, we used the typical error of measurement (TE) (15).
Statistical analysis was carried out under the guidance of a statistician and involved a number of methods including paired t-tests to determine significant differences between trials for all endpoint data, Pearson's correlations, absolute and relative technical error of measurements (TEM) (Knapp, 1992), intra-class correlations (ICC)(Vincent, 1995) and limits of agreement (Atkinson and Nevill, 1998; Bland and Altman, 1986), which have been detailed in an earlier publication (Wallman and Campbell, 2007).
The resulting error of measurement of ~4% in the test is about three-fold more than the ~1-2% usually observed for peak power in incremental tests when there is no pre-load (Hopkins et al.
7 in Lohman and Hagen (2002) shows that the error of measurement at this score is 14.
Across such verbal ability scales, then, specific error of measurement is controlled by averaging (or summing) across scales.
Newstead & Dennis argued that the standard error of measurement is a more useful index of marker (dis)agreement than the reliability coefficient.
Expecting error of measurement after correction near to 0,01 % of scale, the values [[tau].
Substantial random or systematic error of measurement in a
The Fourth Circuit responded that, even if the "Flynn Effect" did exist, there was insufficient evidence that the standard error of measurement, which could lower or raise an IQ test score, actually lowered Walton's IQ score to the requisite degree.
This correlated error of measurement may be the result of the PIAT protocol which specifies that children who score less than a certain cut off score on Reading Recognition are assigned their Reading Recognition score as their Reading Comprehension score (Center for Human Resource Research, 1993, p.
The standard error of measurement from these overall reliability estimates was 2.