erucic acid


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erucic acid

[ə′rüs·ik ′as·əd]
(organic chemistry)
C22H42O2 A monoethenoid acid that is the cis isomer of brassidic acid and makes up 40 to 50% of the total fatty acid in rapeseed, wallflower seed, and mustard seed; crystallizes as needles from alcohol solution, insoluble in water, soluble in ethanol and methanol.
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Despite the decrease in VLCFA, clinical studies have indicated that LO failed to stop the progressive demyelination, suggesting that erucic acid, the active component of LO, did not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB).
High erucic acid rapeseed oil is used in better-quality factices because it provides a harder product in a shorter reaction time (ref.
Although there have been no confirmed cases of erucic acid poisoning in humans, it has been linked to fatty deposits in, and the inflammation of, heart muscles in animals.
When erucic acid is treated with ammonia, it forms amides, an excellent material for preventing various types of plastic sheets or films from sticking together as they're manufactured and used.
In a study on the biosynthetic pathway of NA formation, scientists found that NA is formed through elongation of the carbonic chain of erucic acid (docosanoic acid) (Lecerf 1980).
Made with 20% erucic acid and 80% oleic acid, the boy's parents found that Lorenzo's Oil, while not a cure, slowed down the degenerative nature of the disease.
Trading Standards officers want anyone buying Far East foods to beware of pickles, sauces and preserved vegetables which contained illegally high levels of erucic acid.
The original rapeseed oil, used as a lubricant, caused heart disease when ingested because of high levels of a chemical called erucic acid.
It produces oil containing high levels of erucic acid, which is converted to erucamide and used to make a slippage agent for use in plastics.
Canadians began cross-pollinating the rape plants, and by the 1970s developed a variety that contains less than two percent erucic acid.
In the 1960s the elimination of the content of erucic acid glycerides in rapeseed oil was the first step in the selection of rape plants to obtain edible rape oil.
Canola seeds are low in erucic acid, making their oil more palatable than the oil from other varieties of rape.