erythema

(redirected from erythematous)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to erythematous: erythematous candidiasis

erythema

(ĕr'əthē`mə), more or less diffuse redness of the skin due to concentration of an abnormally large amount of blood within the small vessels of the skin (hyperemia), as in burns. Erythema nodosum is often associated with systemic diseases such as tuberculosis and rheumatic fever. Tender, bright red, slightly elevated nodules develop along the shins. Erythema multiforme can have a number of causes, including viral and bacterial infection, chronic disease of the visceral organs, or allergic reactions to drugs.

Erythema

 

reddening of the skin caused by the dilatation of blood vessels. Erythema sometimes occurs by reflex action and disappears quickly, for example, when one feels ashamed or angry. With inflammation, the condition lasts longer. It appears as a result of exposure to chemicals and physical factors (friction, heat, cold, ultraviolet radiation) and in some infectious diseases (scarlet fever, measles, erythema infectiosum) and skin diseases (dermatitis). It also occurs as a result of poisoning and disturbances in blood circulation.

erythema

[‚er·ə′thē·mə]
(medicine)
Localized redness of the skin in areas of variable size.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our patient's case, punch biopsy of the NAC would have been appropriate at the first signs of friable, erythematous changes.
Multiple erythematous, squamous, annular plaques of varying sizes are seen on upper arms and trunk.
Dermatological examination revealed well-defined, bilaterally symmetrical, hyperkeratotic, erythematous to violaceous, lichenified plaques on dorsal aspect of feet, ankles, Achilles tendons and lower one third of anterior surface of shins.
The rash was characteristic of EM, with annular cutaneous manifestations and multiple target-like erythematous lesions.
A skin biopsy taken from the erythematous plaques showed mildly atrophic epidermis with multiple foamy macrophages and lymphocytes in the dermis.
A 36-h-old full-term, vaginally delivered, male neonate with no significant antenatal history was admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with erythematous lesions over the genital region of 16-h duration [Figure 1].
On examination, there were diffuse erythematous infiltrated papules coalescing into plaques involving the trunk, bilateral shoulders and extending to lower extremities, in addition to the previous keratoderma.
Table 1: History on dogs with Staphylococcal deep pyoderma Duration Breed Sex Age of Clinical signs infection GSD M 1y 1 week Erythematous nodules Rott F 3y 3 weeks Pustules GSD M 4Y 3 weeks Haemorrhagic pus from pressure points Dachs F 4m 2 months Pustules on different body parts Dachs m 4y 1 mon Haemorrhagic nodules in Interdigital space Dachs F 12y 1 mon Haemorrhagic pus from pressure points Great M 3y6m 6m Haemorrhagic pus Dane from pressure points Rott F 9y 4weeks Pustules in the interdigital space pug M 3y 2 weeks Haemorrhagic bullae in the interdigital space GSD M 3y 3weeks Erythematous nodules over the paws Dachs M 2y 3m Recurrent erythema- tous nodules all over body Rott M 2y 6m Recurrent haemorrahic pustules Previous Breed antibiotic Durat.
A 56-year-old Caucasian male newly diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) M3 presented with a six-week history of multiple painful erythematous nodules scattered on his trunk and extremities, previously treated as abscesses with incision and drainage plus oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole without improvement.
This disease is characterized by depapillation, erythematous areas showing raised greyish or white circinate lines or bands with irregular pattern on the dorsal surface of the tongue.
On day 17 of PIP/TAZ therapy, while fever and neutropenia were still persisting, an ulcerated erythematous lesion with a necrotic center was detected on the patient's right hip, and there were smaller acneiform, erythematous nodular lesions on the left side of the abdominal wall, the left hip, the forearm, and the axilla (Figures 1 and 2).