erythromycin


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erythromycin

(ĭrĭth'rōmī`sĭn), any of several related antibiotic drugs produced by bacteria of the genus Streptomyces (see antibioticantibiotic,
any of a variety of substances, usually obtained from microorganisms, that inhibit the growth of or destroy certain other microorganisms. Types of Antibiotics
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). Erythromycin is most effective against gram-positive bacteria such as pneumococci, streptococci, and some staphylococci (see Gram's stainGram's stain,
laboratory staining technique that distinguishes between two groups of bacteria by the identification of differences in the structure of their cell walls. The Gram stain, named after its developer, Danish bacteriologist Christian Gram, has become an important tool
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). The antibiotic also has some effect on gram-negative bacteria and some fungi. Erythromycin inhibits protein synthesis in susceptible microorganisms. It is used to treat such diseases as pneumonia caused by fungi, and streptococcus and syphilis infections, especially where the patient is allergic to penicillin.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Erythromycin

 

a macrolide antibiotic, the chief producer of which is the soil-inhabiting organism Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin is active against most grampositive bacteria (such as staphylococci, streptococci, and pneumococci), certain gram-negative bacteria (such as brucellae), rickettsiae, and large viruses. It fights staphylococci that are resistant to penicillin, antibiotics of the tetracycline group, and streptomycin. Erythromycin is used for treating pneumonia and other infectious diseases.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

erythromycin

[ə‚rith·rə′mīs·ən]
(microbiology)
A crystalline antibiotic produced by Streptomyces erythreus and used in the treatment of gram-positive bacterial infections.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
aureus isolates, which showed resistance to E (Zone size [less than or equal to] 13mm) and susceptibility to CD (zone size [greater than or equal to] 21 mm) with flattening of zone of inhibition around Clindamycin in the area adjacent to the Erythromycin (D shaped zone), indicated positive D-zone test.
Dilutions of the mating mixtures were spread onto LB agar plates containing 10 [micro]g/ml tetracycline or erythromycin (Sigma-Aldrich) and selective antibiotic (chloramphenicol, rifampicin, or ampicillin, all from Sigma-Aldrich) (double selective medium), agar plates containing 10 [micro]g/ml tetracycline or erythromycin (Sigma-Aldrich) or selective antibiotic (single selective medium), and nonselective medium without antibiotics.
There were two studies reporting adverse effects of erythromycin. Compared with placebo, erythromycin did not increase the risk of adverse effects such as vomiting, loose stool, and phlebitis (RR 2.15, 95% CI (0.20, 22.82); P = 0.52, [I.sup.2] =0%) (Figure 5).
aureus isolates found to be resistance to erythromycin by phenotypic methods contained at least 1 were erythromycin resistance gene.
Erythromycin, a commonly used macrolide antibiotic, has been found to possess potent prokinetic properties.
erythromycin: 1000 and 500 mg/l for erythromycin resistant strains and 10 and 0.1 mg/l for erythromycin sensitive strains and 500, 100 and 10 mg/l for clindamycin.
to benzyl penicillin, erythromycin and rifampicin that were significantly different (P<0.0001) as a result of the application of different concentrations of antimicrobials tested.
Analyses were extensively adjusted, and the results are in line with anecdotal reports of serious and sometimes lethal statin toxicity in older adults given erythromycin or clarithromycin.
The erythromycin-clindamycin double-disk test was carried out for the determination of the resistance phenotypes among all the erythromycin resistant strains, as previously described.
When possible, prescribing a statin with a clarithromycin or erythromycin should be avoided, particularly among older patients because of their higher risk, researchers warned.
If a woman is determined to be penicillin allergic, susceptibility testing for clindamycin and erythromycin should be ordered.